Page 11234..1020..»

Stem Cell Therapy – Maine Veterinary Medical Center

Posted: August 29, 2016 at 1:55 am

Stem Cell Therapy

After many years of research, it now possible to provide affordable same-day stem cell therapy to dogs and cats suffering from a variety of degenerative diseases and injuries. With our Stemlogix in-clinic stem cell isolation process, our board certified veterinarians can extract fat tissue, isolate millions of regenerative stem cells and deliver them back to the patient all in about 90 minutesin just one office visit!

This quick turnaround maintains the highest cell viability and functionality which gives patients the best chance for clinical improvement. Stemlogix stem cell therapy can relieve pain, increase range of motion in joints and improve the quality of life in pets suffering from the following conditions:

Arthritis Joint pain Cartilage damage Tendon & ligament damage Hip dysplasia

Often your pet will have renewed energy and freedom of movement. Talk to your veterinarian about gradually reintroducing activity in order to prevent aggravating the condition.

Stem cells are delivered to an area of damaged tissue where they stimulate regeneration and aid in repair of the damaged tissue. In addition, the stem cells have the ability to differentiate into many different cell types such as tendon, bone, ligament and cartilage, which may further help in the repair of damaged tissue.

Your pet will undergo a simple surgical procedure to obtain a fat tissue sample either from the shoulder area or from the abdomen. The tissue sample will be processed in about an hour directly on-site at our state-of-the-art facility where highly viable & potent regenerative stem cells are obtained. The stem cells are then delivered back to your pet at the injury site and/or with an intravenous (IV) infusion.

The Stemlogix stem cells are derived from the animals own tissue and they can be injected in large concentrations in the area of injury. Because the injected cells are derived from the animals own tissue and are minimally manipulated there is almost no risk of rejection or reaction. The main goals of stem cell therapy are to provide long-term anti-inflammatory effects, slow the progression of cartilage degeneration and initiate healing of the damaged tissue. This provides pain relief within a few days to a few weeks after the injection with further improvement as healing progresses.

For more information, please visit http://www.stemlogix.com

See original here:
Stem Cell Therapy – Maine Veterinary Medical Center

Posted in Maine Stem Cells | Comments Off on Stem Cell Therapy – Maine Veterinary Medical Center

6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell … – University of Hawaii

Posted: at 1:54 am

Case Based Pediatrics For Medical Students and Residents Department of Pediatrics, University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine Chapter V.6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Graft Versus Host DiseaseJocelyn M. Sonson December 2002 Return to Table of Contents

This is a 7 year old female who presents to the office with a chief complaint of a rash on her head, arms and legs. She has a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. She had undergone chemotherapy, went into remission and subsequently received an allogeneic stem cell transplantation from her older brother 20 days ago. The rash started 3 days ago on her ears, palms of her hands and the soles of her feet, progressing further to her arms and legs. It has not progressed to involve her trunk or her extremities and there is no desquamation or bullae formation. She denies any GI discomfort, crampy abdominal pain or diarrhea.

Exam: VS T 38, P 100, R 20, BP 118/65. She is alert and active, in no apparent distress. HEENT negative except for the rash. The rash is an erythematous, maculopapular rash on her palms and soles bilaterally, and on the anterior aspects her arms and legs. The rash is also on the nape of her neck. Neck is supple. Chest is clear. Heart regular without murmurs. Abdomen is soft and non-tender. There might be some slight hepatosplenomegaly, but it is difficult to be certain.

She is diagnosed with early graft versus host disease. She is hospitalized and treated with cyclosporine and methylprednisolone for 10 days until the graft versus host disease (GVHD) is controlled. This was followed by a taper of her corticosteroids.

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, commonly called bone marrow transplantation (BMT), is indicated for various hematopoietic disorders (aplastic anemia, hemoglobinopathies), storage diseases, and severe immunodeficiencies. Pediatric malignancies that are candidates for stem cell transplantation include acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CML), lymphomas, neuroblastomas, brain tumors and other solid tumors. Transplantation is recommended only in high-risk situations or when conventional treatment fails. In malignancies such as CML and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is used as primary therapy because no other curative treatment exists.

Major sources of stem cells for transplantation include bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood. Since the mid-1990s, peripheral blood-derived stem cells have been used with increasing frequency over the traditional marrow cells. Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) contain higher numbers of progenitor cells, natural killer cells, and T cells as compared to bone marrow. Studies comparing bone marrow to PBSC transplantation have shown that PBSCs are associated with a shorter period of neutropenia and red blood cell and platelet transfusion dependence, with an equal probability of acute and chronic GVHD. Umbilical cord blood is a new and promising source of hematopoietic progenitor cells with remarkable proliferative potential, which may overcome the limitation of their relatively low absolute cell numbers. Because only a small number of cells are collected, successful transplants are typically limited to smaller sized recipients.

When the stem cells are from an identical twin, the transplant is termed syngeneic. When the stem cells are harvested from the recipient, the transplant is termed autologous. And lastly, when the stem cells are from someone other than the recipient, it is termed allogeneic. The best donors for allogeneic transplantation are siblings who inherit identical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes.

Located in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on the short arm of chromosome 6, the HLA genes define histocompatibility and determine tolerance of the graft. Although there are over 35 HLA class I and II genes and over 684 alleles, HLA-A, HLA-B (class I), and HLA-DRB1 (class II) genes are used primarily in determining the histocompatibility of donors and recipients for stem cell transplantation. A 6-of-6 match refers to matching these three genes, each of which have two alleles. When none of the 6 alleles match, it is termed a mismatch and the various degrees of mismatch are termed one-antigen mismatch, two-antigen mismatch, etc. When only 3 of 6 alleles mismatch, the term is haploidentical. Graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) are the major immune-mediated complications associated with HLA disparity. The greater the HLA disparity, the higher these risks. Only 25-50% of patients have an HLA-identical sibling, therefore large donor registries have recently been successful in identifying phenotypically matched unrelated donors. In the United States, the National Marrow Donor Program has typed nearly 4 million volunteer donors and uses 118 donor centers and over 57 transplant centers to add 40,000 potential new donors each month.

The initial phase of stem cell transplantation entails the administration of the preparative regimen: chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The most common conditioning regimens include total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide or busulfan and cyclophosphamide. Other combinations are also used during this conditioning period and include drugs such as etoposide, melphan, carmustine, cytosine arabinoside, thiotepa, ifosfamide, and carboplatin. The combinations are designed to eliminate malignancy, prevent rejection of new stem cells, and to create space for the new cells.

The stem cells infusion takes over an hour, although this time frame depends on the volume infused. Before infusion, the patient is premedicated with acetaminophen and diphenhydramine to reduce the risk of hypersensitivity reaction. The cells are then infused through a central venous catheter. Anaphylaxis, volume overload, and a transient GVHD are the major complications involved.

After stem cell infusion, the primary focus of care is managing the high-intensity preparative regimen. During this period, patients have little or no marrow function and are neutropenic, thus they must depend on transfusions for maintaining erythrocytes and platelets at acceptable levels. Patients are susceptible to life-threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) or hospital-acquired nosocomial infections as well as other complications such as veno-occlusive disease, fluid retention, pulmonary edema, and acral erythroderma.

The rate of engraftment is a function of the preparative regimen, the nature and dose of stem cells, and the administration of medications that can suppress recovery. Engraftment, typically defined as a neutrophil count greater than 500 per cubic mm and a platelet count of 20,000 per cubic mm can occur as soon as 10 days to as long as several weeks after infusion. It is during this period that GVHD may occur.

Graft failure and graft rejection of transplanted stem cells, as well as transplanted organs, are influenced by several factors such as HLA disparity, the conditioning regimen, the transplanted cell dose, post-transplant/immunosuppression, donor T cells, drug toxicity and viral infection. Graft rejection may occur immediately, without an increase in cell counts, or may follow a brief period of engraftment. Rejection is usually mediated by residual host T cells, cytotoxic antibodies, or lymphokines and is manifested by a fall in donor cell counts with a persistence of host lymphocytes. Using stem cells from HLA-disparate donors significantly increases the risk for graft rejection/failure.

Transplants for nonmalignant disease generally have more favorable outcomes, with survival rates of 70-90% if the donor is a matched sibling and 36-65% if the donor is unrelated. Transplants for acute leukemias, ALL and AML, in remission at the time of transplant have survival rates of 55-68% if the donor is related and 26-50% if the donor is unrelated . Outcome statistics of autologous transplant for solid tumors are not as good for pediatric malignancies, except for lymphomas.

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a clinical syndrome that affects recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplants and results in donor T-cell activation against host MHC antigens. There are three requirements for this reaction to occur: 1) the graft must contain immunocompetent cells, 2) the host must be immunocompromised and unable to reject or mount a response to the graft, and 3) there must be histocompatibility differences between the graft and the host.

GVHD can be classified as acute, occurring within the first 100 days after stem cell transplant, or chronic, occurring after the first 100 days. The acute form of GVHD (aGVHD) is characterized by erythroderma, cholestatic hepatitis, and enteritis. aGVHD typically presents about day 19 (median), when patients begin to engraft. It usually starts as either erythroderma or a maculopapular rash that involves the hands and feet and may progress from the top of the scalp down toward the torso, potentially leading to exfoliation or bulla formation. Hepatic manifestations include cholestatic jaundice with elevated values on liver function testing. Intestinal symptoms include crampy abdominal pain and watery diarrhea, often with blood. aGVHD is graded in 5 steps from 0-IV based on involvement of the skin, liver, and GI tract. Grade 0 indicates no clinical evidence of disease. Grade I-IV are graded functionally. Grade I indicates rash on less than 50% of skin and no gut or liver involvement. Grade II indicates rash covering more than 50% of skin, bilirubin 2-3 ml/dL, diarrhea 10-15 ml/kg/d, or persistent nausea. Grade III or IV indicates generalized erythroderma with bulla formation, bilirubin greater than 3 mg/dl, or diarrhea more than 16 mL/kg/d. Survival rates vary from 90% in stage I, 60% in stage II or III, to almost 0% in stage IV.

The development of chronic GVHD (cGVHD), usually occurs after day 100 and resembles a multi-system autoimmune process manifesting as Sjogren’s (sicca) syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma, lichen planus, and biliary cirrhosis. Recurrent infections from encapsulated bacterial, fungal, and viral organisms are common. The survival rate after onset of chronic GVHD is approximately 42%.

Management of GVHD and graft rejection focuses on both prevention and control of progressive disease. Finding the best HLA matched donor results in the lowest risk of severe disease and rejection. Younger age in either the donor or the recipient is associated with reduced risk. Same gender transplantation is also associated with reduced risk for GVHD. Prophylactic immunosuppression aims to inhibit the host T-lymphocyte activation that mediates rejection and inhibits the donor T-lymphocyte activation that mediates GVHD without altering immunity against infection or malignancy. Because donor T cells are responsible for GVHD, a form of prevention involves depletion of T cells in donor marrows or grafts using monoclonal antibodies or a physical separation technique. Elimination of T cells from the donor graft is an effective approach in some clinical settings, however depletion of T cells allows the persistence of host lymphocytes, which are capable of mediating graft rejection. In addition, loss of donor T cells decreases the benefit of producing a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect and a lower relapse rate.

Treatment of aGVHD focuses on eliminating activated alloreactive T-cell clones. High-dose corticosteroids remain the most effective. Other studied approaches include anti-thymocyte antibodies, anti-TNF and IL-2 receptor antibodies, and immunosuppressive therapy such as cyclosporine, FK506, or mycophenolate mofetil. Treatment for cGVHD should begin with the earliest development of symptoms and requires continued therapy for a minimum of 6 to 9 months, even if symptoms resolve. Therapy for cGVHD includes corticosteroids usually in combination with another agent, often cyclosporine.

Late effects of transplantation can be classified into three basic categories: 1) toxicity from the preparative regimen, 2) toxicity from GVHD, and 3) toxicity from long-term immunosuppression. Clinical conditions include effects on growth and development, neuroendocrine dysfunction, fertility, second tumors, chronic GVHD, cataracts, leukoencephalopathy, and immune dysfunction. The effect of radiation on growth is relatively common and can be a result of a multitude of factors. Disruption of growth hormone production is the most common effect, however thyroid dysfunction, gonadal dysfunction, and bone growth effects also occur due to radiation. Other toxicities include cataracts, azoospermia, and gonadal failure.

Long-term cGVHD effects on the body include disruption of normal glandular function resulting in drying of the eyes, which can lead to corneal injury, and decreased salivary gland production, which can cause severe dental caries. Chronic inflammation of the intestine can lead to strictures and webs. The skin manifestations such as maculopapular rash or a sclerodermatous condition, can extend to all parts of the body and cause fibrosis of the underlying subcutaneous tissues and fascia resulting in contractures.

Continued use of chronic immunosuppressive drugs can cause toxicity that hamper quality of life. These toxicities include hypertension, glucose intolerance, weight gain, growth failure, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and chronic osteopenia that leads to recurrent fractures. Long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs can lead to recurrent infections, such as bacterial, fungal, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus and varicella zoster.

Questions

1. Which of the following is a requirement for a graft-versus-host disease reaction to occur. . . . . . a. The graft must contain immunocompetent cells. . . . . . b. The host’s T-lymphocytes must be able to mount an immune response against the graft. . . . . . c. The host must be immunocompromised . . . . . d. a and b . . . . . e. a and c

2. True/False: The best predictors for developing GVHD are the age and sex of both the donor and recipient.

3. During the conditioning period prior to stem cell transplantation, which of the following purposes does chemotherapy and/or radiation try to accomplish? . . . . . a. Prevent rejection of new stem cells . . . . . b. Create space for new cells . . . . . c. Eliminate malignancy . . . . . d. All of the above . . . . . e. None of the above

4. True/False: A limitation of cord blood as a source for stem cells is the small number of cells collected.

5. During which period does graft-versus-host disease typically occur? . . . . . a. Conditioning . . . . . b. Engraftment . . . . . c. Postengraftment . . . . . d. All of the above . . . . . e. None of the above

References

1. Graham DK, et al. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. In: Hay WW, Hayward AR, Levin MJ, et al (eds). Current Pediatric Diagnosis and Treatment, 15th edition. 2001, New York, NY: Lange/McGraw Hill, pp. 1589-1594.

2. Childs RW. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation. In: DeVita VT, Hellman S, Rosenberg SA (eds). Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 6th Edition. 2001, Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, pp. 2786-2788.

3. Moore T. Bone Marrow Transplantation. In: Firlit CF, Konop R, Dunn S, et al (eds). eMedicine Journal 2002;3(1).

4. Robertson KA. Bone Marrow Transplantation. In: Behrman RE, et al (eds). Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 16th edition. 2000, Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 639-641.

5. Hayashi RJ. Stem Cell Transplantation. In: Rudolph CD, Rudolph AM (eds). Rudolph’s Pediatric Textbook, 21st edition. 2002, New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, pp. 815-816.

6. Suterwala MS. Graft Versus Host Disease. In: Shigeoka AO, Konop R, Georgitis JW, et al (eds), eMedicine Journal 2001;2(10).

Answers to questions

1. e

2. False. HLA matching is the best predictor.

3. d

4. True

5. b

See more here:
6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell … – University of Hawaii

Posted in Hawaii Stem Cells | Comments Off on 6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell … – University of Hawaii

Stem Cells – Resources for Research Ethics Education

Posted: August 28, 2016 at 12:50 pm

In recent years, biomedical research has been significantly altered by technologies for the derivation of human cell lines capable of differentiation into any of the cells of the human body. Such cells are sometimes called “pluripotent” because they have the power (“potency”) to become many (“pluri-“) different cells. It has long been known that such cells exist, but it wasnt until 1981 that stem cells were isolated from mouse embryos (Evans and Kaufman, 1981; Martin, 1981), and only in 1998 that the derivation of human embryonic stem cells was first reported (Thomson et al., 1998). This tool was quickly recognized as an opportunity to better understand normal and pathological human development, to identify and test new pharmacological therapies, and perhaps to even replace diseased tissues or organs. Many scientists viewed this as a potentially revolutionary approach to studying human biology. However, because a necessary first step was to use and destroy human embryos such research raised serious questions for some members of the public, as well as some scientists.

While most hESC scientists view the human embryo as human cells with great biological and scientific potential, there are many members of our society who hold religious beliefs that define the human embryo as equivalent to a human life. By this view, any harm or destruction of the human embryo is tantamount to harm or destruction of a human life. This perspective has become more than a matter of personal opinion. For many years now, under the Dickey amendment (1995), the U.S. Congress has agreed to federal restrictions on any research that would require harm or destruction of the human embryo. This restriction was partially lifted in 2001 by President Bushs announcement that research with stem cell lines existing as of August 9, 2001 could be eligible for federal funding.

Subsequently, President Obama annouced a new approach to approving stem cell lines for federal funding (Obama, 2009). The question now is not whether stem cell lines were created before a particular date, but whether or not those lines meet criteria that have been defined for ethically derived stem cell lines (NIH, 2009). While the result has been an increase in the number of stem cell lines approved for federal funding, it is noteworthy that the number of lines meeting these criteria is limited (NIH Human Embryonic Stem Cell Registry). In fact, many of the lines approved under the Bush policy are not acceptable under the Obama guidelines.

It would be a mistake to assume that religion is the only basis for arguments against hESC research. It is clear that some individuals and groups are motivated more by philosophical, political, or even economic arguments. However, whether based on religion or otherwise, most polls show that opponents to hESC research may represent a minority, but that minority is substantial in size and in impact (e.g., pollingreport.com).

Stem cells can be obtained from embryos, but embryos are only one of many potential sources. In the fetus, and even in an adult, stem cells can be found in many body tissues. The best known of these sources is bone marrow, in which stem cells are produced that are capable of differentiating into different types of blood ells. However, these stem cells are not pluripotent as defined above. Such cells are often called adult or tissue-specific stem cells. These cells have important, but restricted, clinical applications distinct from the wider range of possibilities with human embryonic stem cells (Wood, 2005).

Several sources of pluripotent stem cells have now been identified. One of these sources is based on the technology used to clone Dolly the sheep (Campbell et al., 1996), Snuppy the dog (Lee et al., 2005), and many other mammalian species. The first step to cloning these animals is a technique called Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT). SCNT in any species begins with an egg of that species from which the genetic material is removed. This egg can then be fused with an adult cell of the individual to be cloned. The result is an egg that now contains a full complement of DNA. Under appropriate laboratory conditions, that egg can be induced to divide as if it were a fertilized egg. If allowed to progress far enough, the resulting embryo can be implanted in the uterus of an individual of the same species, potentially resulting in the birth of a clone. However, it is also possible to allow the embryo to develop only for the purpose of harvesting stem cells rather than implantation. This source of stem cells is particularly important for stem cell research as well as potential therapies because of the opportunity to produce stem cells and differentiated cells that are genetically and immunologically matched to the adult donor.

Until 2005, researchers had been frustrated in their attempts to duplicate with human cells the same success achieved with SCNT in many other mammalian species. Some researchers were considering the possibility that SCNT in humans would be for all practical purposes impossible. This view was apparently proven wrong when the laboratory of Dr. Hwang Woo Suk published a report demonstrating successful derivation of stem cell lines from eleven separate cases of human SCNT (Hwang et al., 2005). Hwang, whose laboratory had cloned the first dog (Lee et al., 2005), was seen as so far ahead with SCNT that other laboratories around the world suspended attempts to achieve human SCNT, choosing instead to collaborate with Hwangs laboratory. Unfortunately, the story began to unravel in late 2005 and by the next year it was clear that the results announced in Dr. Hwangs paper were entirely falsified (Kennedy, 2006). Because researchers throughout the world had chosen to not pursue SCNT, this line of research was set back a year or more. It wasnt until 2008 that scientists at Stemagen successfully reported human SCNT (French et al., 2008)

Although SCNT has both scientific and therapeutic benefits, it still raises significant ethical questions, particularly because it depends on women who are willing and able to donate some of their eggs. Egg donation is not free of risk and, therefore, many bioethics committees and regulatory bodies have decided to err on the side of caution by prohibiting payment for eggs donated for the purposes of stem cell research. While on the one hand this position might be seen as paternalistic, the case can be made that any significant payment might lead those who are young or poor to overlook the possible risks of donation. The debate about payment is likely to continue, but it is clear that SCNT depends on a resource (human eggs) that is in limited supply and that can be obtained only through a time-consuming and invasive procedure.

An ongoing hope is that pluripotent cells might be found without the need for either human embryos or eggs. A number of reports have suggested that such cells might be found, for example, in amniotic fluid (De Coppi et al., 2007) and testes (Conrad et al., 2008). Another approach, reprogramming of adult cells, has been found to be far easier than expected and provisionally as good as or better than other sources of cells. In brief, cells (e.g., fibroblasts) are obtained from an individual, treated with a viral vector to introduce as few as 4 genes which, effectively, dedifferentiate (reprogram) the cells to become pluripotent stem cells (Takahishi et al., 2007; Yu et al., 2007). These cells are now commonly referred to as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Although these findings are intriguing, it remains to be seen whether the various alternative sources of pluripotent stem cells will prove to have the same qualities as the stem cells derived from human embryos (Hyun et al., 2007).

In just ten years (1998-2008), the field of human embryonic stem cell research evolved rapidly. Almost certainly, because of intense public scrutiny, the landscape for regulations and guidelines has also evolved rapidly. Unfortunately, the regulatory environment for this research varies not only across international borders, but significant differences are found even among the states of the United States. It is neither useful nor possible to describe regulations in each of these jurisdictions both because of extensive variation and because regulatory changes continue to be driven by changing public opinion and rapid advances in the sciences. However, a few examples are useful to illustrate the complex and often conflicting approaches to stem cell research across international and interstate borders.

Internationally, the environment for stem cell research ranges from a virtual prohibition to a near absence of restriction (Isasi and Knoppers, 2006). Several countries, including Austria, Norway, and Poland, have prohibited any human embryo research. Others, such as the U.S. and Germany, prohibit the use of federal funds for hESC research, but in the face of public pressure both countries have adopted national policies that allow the use of federal funds for stem cell lines created before August 2001 and May 2007, respectively. Finally, for all practical purposes, China and Singapore are examples of countries with relatively few restrictions on hESC research.

The variation across international borders in stem cell regulations should not be taken as a sign that the international stem cell community has been silent about the responsible conduct of stem cell research. The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), (one of the leading international stem cell research organizations, has established a variety of guidelines that are now widely accepted throughout the stem cell research community (ISSCR, 2006). Key principles of these guidelines are:

While the U.S. has significant restrictions on the use of federal funds for stem cell research, such research is still permitted to the extent allowed under state laws. As with international stem cell regulations, tremendous variation can be found among different states (National Conference of State Legislatures, 2008). As of 2008, South Dakota prohibits hESC research, while some states (e.g., California, New York) have been not only permissive of stem cell research, but have approved significant public funding dedicated to hESC research.

The fact that some states are highly permissive of stem cell research does not mean that such research occurs in the absence of either regulations or guidelines. Nationally, guidance that is generally accepted has come from the National Academy of Sciences. Following their initial report (Committee on Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, 2005), the NAS has published amendments in 2007 and 2008 (Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Advisory Committee, 2007 and 2008). Two key points in those guidelines are:

One of the states that has been most receptive to hESC research is California. In 2004, a significant majority of California voters approved Proposition 71, creating a mechanism for allocating $3 billion for stem cell research over a 10-year period. This voter approved initiative also put in place a framework to promote scientific, legal and ethical oversight for stem cell research through the creation of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). The resulting requirements for CIRM-funded research have generally been extended to all stem cell research in California. Under California law (California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, 2008), key requirements for stem cell research include requirements for review of the research by the equivalent of an ESCRO Committee, criteria for acceptable derivation of materials that are to be used for research use, and categories of research that are specifically prohibited.

Case Study #1

Clearly, from an ethical perspective, stem cell research constitutes one of the most complex of the numerous domains of research. Many considerations might be listed here, but three seem to be particularly noteworthy.

Chimeras: A chimera is defined in various ways, but the principle is that one organism consists of components that are demonstrably derived from two or more distinct species. The name chimera comes from a monster in Greek mythology that was a combination of different animals (typically a lion, goat, and snake). In biology, chimeras can now be formed either by inserting cells from one species into the adult of another species, or by creating an embryo that begins with cells from two or more species. In principle, it seems that our society already accepts the possibility of saving a childs life by replacing a defective heart with one that is non-human (e.g., a baboon heart, Altman, 1984), but we are much less comfortable with creating a non-human animal that might have human features (e.g., a human face, ear, or hand). Having the appearance of a human is problematic more because of our discomfort than because it necessarily raises some direct ethical dilemma. However, we have reason to be much more concerned about a human nervous system (i.e., do we have a risk of a non-human animal achieving levels of awareness and understanding that would make it sufficiently human to be deserving of human protections?) or human gametes (i.e., do we have a risk of two non-human animals reproducing with human gametes, thereby producing a human, or largely human, organism?). These questions are very much hypothetical and, if not impossible, highly improbable under the circumstance that the ethical, legal, scientific, and social environment is not one that favors these goals. Nonetheless, responsible science and policy require that one concern for reviewers of stem cell research is to address the potential risks with experiments that involve the mixing of stem cells from two or more species.

Clinical Trials: In the very near future, we are likely to see clinical trials based on reputable, pluripotent stem cell research. We are already seeing numerous stem cell “trials” worldwide that are arguably questionable, and sometimes criminal. By taking advantage of public awareness of and excitement about stem cell research, it is now possible to find groups that will offer to treat or cure almost anything in the context of a clinical “trial” that typically has no control group and for which participants must pay for participation. Payments for such “trials” are often on the order of $10,000 or more. Whether intentional or not, these trials are likely to be scams with little chance of success. Particularly under these circumstances, the stem cell field must meet a higher than average standard before approving the first clinical trials with this very new approach to treating disease. To do otherwise risks a backlash against all of stem cell research if initial trials unexpectedly result in a worsening of disease, serious side effects, or even death. All of these are possible outcomes no matter how much work has been done before the first trials in humans. Therefore to decrease that risk the scientific community can and should set a high bar both for the circumstances under which such a trial should be attempted and for the design of the research study to ensure the highest level of protections for informed consent and the welfare of the research participants.

See original here:
Stem Cells – Resources for Research Ethics Education

Posted in South Dakota Stem Cells | Comments Off on Stem Cells – Resources for Research Ethics Education

Donate Marrow | Rhode Island Blood Center

Posted: at 12:50 pm

I Was Saved:

After years of cancer treatment, Wesley needed her perfect match to cure her. She found it in aperfect stranger she now considers her blood sister for eternity.

Michaela’s spur-of-the-moment decision turned out to be Wesley’s life-saving marrow match — herperfectone-in-a-million match.

One patient. One donor. That is how life-saving marrow transplant matchesare made. Every three minutes someone is diagnosed with a blood cancer like leukemia. Thecure isin the hands of ordinarypeople, and it could be you.Through the Rhode Island Blood Center’s partnership withBe The Match, the National Marrow Donor Program, you may find you are theone and only match forsomeone who doesn’t have one in their family. Make today the day you sign up to save someone’s life.

Complete some health questions and forms right here online to sign up. We will send you a cheek swab kit to do the rest. You can also register to become a marrow donor in person at any of the Rhode Island Blood Center’s six blood donation centers or mobile blood drives.

A simple cheek swab you can easily complete yourself is all it takes. Donors and patients are matched by their HLA (human leukocyte antigen) type, which is different from matching blood types, and the results of the cheek swab tell us your type.

Once you are on the registry, doctors search for a close match for their patients. You may match someone who has been waiting for a transplant now, or end up being someone’s match in the future.

About 1 in 540 people on the National Marrow Donor Registrygo on to donate. The most important thing to remember is that you could be someone’s only match and chance at a cure. If you do match, our team will provide a personal information session to learn all the details about the actual donation process.

Stem cells needed for thepatient’s marrowtransplant are collected right at the Rhode Island Blood Center througha process that is similar to donating blood platelets or red cells. It’s called a PeripheralBlood Stem Cell Donation.You would receive five daily shots in the back of your armto boost thenumber of stem cells in your blood stream. Then you make thedonation, which takes about six hours. Donors can experience bone pain from the stem cell boost. Recovery is usually quick, however –just one ortwo days after the donation is made.

25 percent of donations are made at a hospital under anesthesia soyou do not feel any pain. Doctors remove a small amountof marrowfrom your pelvicbone with a needle. Recoveryis usually quick, though some donors may have aches and pains for several days to a few weeks. Your marrow naturally replenishes itself in fourto sixweeks.

If you match a patient, you have the right to change your mind. However, a late decision to not donate can be life-threatening to a patient. Please think seriously about your commitment before joining the registry. Take the pledge:

Some conditions that would prevent you from becoming a marrow donor:

Read the original post:
Donate Marrow | Rhode Island Blood Center

Posted in Rhode Island Stem Cells | Comments Off on Donate Marrow | Rhode Island Blood Center

Planned Parenthood — Are Fetal Stem Cells Needed for …

Posted: at 12:49 pm

In the aftermath of the release of the Center for Medical Progresss hidden-camera video showing a Planned Parenthood official, Dr. Deborah Nucatola, touting the ability and willingness of the abortion provider to harvest fetal tissue hearts, lungs, and always as many intact livers as possible two questions come to mind: What kinds of research requirethe fetal body parts that Planned Parenthood is supplying? And are these tissues harvested from aborted fetuses actually necessary for the advancement of the research?

Some scientists are especially interested in doing research with fetal liver because its a rich source of stem cells, which can have important therapeutic applications, says Dr. David Prentice, research director for the Charlotte Lozier Institute, a pro-life group, and Indiana University stem-cell specialist. At that point in your life while youre in the womb, from about eight weeks after conception up to about 20 to 24 weeks, the fetal liver is very rich in stem cells. Theyre the kinds of stem cells that you would find in bone marrow, Prentice says.

But, he says, the dubiously ethical practice isnt nearly as important or useful as it used to be. Frankly, he says, there is no advantage, nowadays, in fetal stem cells over adult cells. The science has matured.

Fetal stem cells can be used in fields ranging from Parkinsons disease treatments to diabetes research, but Prentice says the focus on fetal stem cells is based on an older idea that they will tend to grow more.

Its a holdover from, frankly, the 1960s and 70s when people were just learning how to grow cells in the lab and it was easier at that stage to grow fetal tissue, he says.

In fact, the fetal cells, because they tend to grow more, tend to be more dangerous, Prentice tells NR. Theres the possibility of producing tumors, which have been seen in some patients. Theres the possibility of producing random tissues instead of a desired tissue. So its not as good as a stem-cell source as adult [stem cells].

If the state of the science says stem cells harvested from fetal tissue are unnecessary, why is there so much demand?

Dr. Samuel Cohen, a University of Nebraska microbiologist, testified before Congress in 2009 that obtaining cells from legally obtained abortions for potentially life-saving purposes is ethically permissible and indeed ethically necessary.

The study of fetal tissue has already led to major discoveries in human health and has the potential to continue to benefit mankind, Cohen said, before concluding that he was confident that we can protect against abuses in the fetal tissue supply arena while also protecting promising life-saving research.

Brendan Foht, assistant editor at the New Atlantis, a conservative science and technology journal, whos covered the stem-cell debate for years, suggests to NR that there doesnt seem to be an ethical necessity here. There are many alternative sources of stem cells that hold comparable promise to fetal and embryonic tissue without raising the same ethical problems, he says.

For instance, umbilical-cord blood is a rich source of stem cells that can be stored and cultured for extended periods, and can be used for a wide variety of therapeutic purposes, Foht says.

Prentice sees two reasons for the continued focus on fetal stem cells among some in the research community: Ideologically they dont see any problem with using tissue harvested from abortion, he says, although the ethical concerns about using aborted fetal tissue are widespread, and not just confined to passionate pro-lifers.

The other part of it, he says, is that I dont think they have caught on with the more recent science. They are still working off this mindset of easier growing tissue, faster growing tissue and thats why theyre looking for fetal rather than adult stem cells.

If you look at the published results, whether its adult stem cells and then comparing to fetal stem cells or to embryonic stem cells, when we talk about treating patients, adult stem cells are the gold standard, Prentice continues. And virtually all success over a million patients now is due to adult stem cells.

Is it possible the researchers using fetal stem cells dont know the likely provenance of the tissuethat theyre just trying to use stem cells, period?

Dr. Theresa Deisher, president of Sound Choice Pharmaceutical Institute, a group dedicated to investigating the use of fetal tissue, finds that unlikely.

They would be aware of the source and this type of research requires ongoing delivery of fresh tissue, Deisher tells NR.

Prentice agrees: I think it would be very unlikely for them not to know the source of the tissue. In most cases they are specifically after fetal cells thats what theyre requesting from these companies. They see this as an ongoing need for fresh cells and fresh tissue and thats when they then turn to suppliers like StemExpress, [which] was mentioned in the video.

And so we had a conversation, and said you know, what do you think, well just go out and find out all the people that are doing this and present everybody with a menu, Nucatola continued.

The menu being, of course, a reference to the litany of body parts ready for harvesting from aborted fetus.

Just how far down the path toward complete dehumanization of fetal tissue for research purposes have we gone? Plenty far, says Deisher.

There are simply too many ethical problems raised by the use of fetal tissue for therapy or research, Deisher says. We need to shut that box again.

Thankfully, if researchers like Prentice are right, new science may mean we can do so without imperiling much important work at all.

Mark Antonio Wright is an intern at National Review.

See the rest here:
Planned Parenthood — Are Fetal Stem Cells Needed for …

Posted in Nebraska Stem Cells | Comments Off on Planned Parenthood — Are Fetal Stem Cells Needed for …

Autologous Stem Cell Transplant – Nebraska Med

Posted: August 27, 2016 at 3:46 pm

Stem cells are unique cells located in bone marrow or peripheral blood that can develop into red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The goal of cancer treatments such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy is to destroy cancer cells. Unfortunately bone marrow and other healthy cells are damaged in the process. In an autologous stem cell transplant, bone marrow stem cells are removed from the patient’s own body prior to cancer treatment in order to protect them.

Stem cells can be collected in two ways. The primary method involves collection of stem cells from the peripheral blood. For this procedure, medication is given a few days prior to collection to encourage stem cells to leave the bone marrow and enter the blood. Blood is then withdrawn from one arm and circulated through an apheresis machine, or a “cell separator,” where the stem cells are removed. The remaining blood components are returned through the catheter in the other arm.

If this method does not provide enough stem cells, they may be taken directly from bone marrow. To harvest stem cells from bone marrow, the physician will use a special syringe to retrieve the bone marrow from the hip bone. Once removed, the bone marrow is processed to remove the stem cells.

After being removed from the blood, stem cells are frozen. Following cancer treatment, the stem cells are thawed and then drawn into a syringe so they can be returned or “transplanted” back into the body through a central line. In the first two weeks following the procedure, the immune system will be compromised and transfusions of platelets and red blood cells will be necessary. During this time, the stem cells begin producing new blood cells and restoring bone marrow. Close monitoring is necessary to ensure the bone marrow and immune system are functioning effectively.

Read the rest here:
Autologous Stem Cell Transplant – Nebraska Med

Posted in Nebraska Stem Cells | Comments Off on Autologous Stem Cell Transplant – Nebraska Med

Tissue Niches & Resident Stem Cells in Adult Epithelia – GRC

Posted: August 26, 2016 at 1:49 pm

Sunday 2:00 pm – 8:00 pm Arrival and Check-in 6:00 pm Dinner 7:30 pm – 7:40 pm Welcome / Introductory Comments by GRC Site Staff 7:40 pm – 9:30 pm Keynote Session: Signaling Unity Within Epithelial Stem Cell Diversity Discussion Leader: Allan Spradling (Carnegie Institution for Science / Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA) 7:40 pm – 7:50 pm Opening Remarks 7:50 pm – 7:55 pm Introduction by Discussion Leader 7:55 pm – 8:35 pm Roeland Nusse (Stanford University, USA) “Stem Cells in Liver Homeostasis” 8:35 pm – 8:45 pm Discussion 8:45 pm – 9:25 pm Fiona Watt (King’s College London, United Kingdom) “In Vitro Approaches to Analyze the Epidermal Stem Cell Niche” 9:25 pm – 9:30 pm Discussion Monday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am – 12:30 pm Epithelial Stem Cells and Their Skin Niches Discussion Leaders: Fiona Watt (King’s College London, United Kingdom) and Xiaoyang Wu (University of Chicago, USA) 9:00 am – 9:05 am Introduction by Discussion Leader 9:05 am – 9:25 am Howard Chang (Stanford University, USA) “RNA World and Regulation of Gene Expression” 9:25 am – 9:35 am Discussion 9:35 am – 9:55 am Pritinder Kaur (Curtin University, Australia) “MSC-Like Dermal Pericytes Influence Epidermal Renewal by Promoting Symmetric Keratinocyte Cell Divisions” 9:55 am – 10:00 am Discussion 10:00 am – 10:30 am Group Photo / Coffee Break 10:30 am – 10:50 am Valerie Horsley (Yale University, USA) “Adipocytes as Niche Cells in Epithelial Tissues” 10:50 am – 11:00 am Discussion 11:00 am – 11:20 am Xing Dai (University of California, Irvine, USA) “Keeping Skin and Mammary Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells Epithelial” 11:20 am – 11:30 am Discussion 11:30 am – 11:50 am Vladimir Botchkarev (Boston University, USA / University of Bradford, United Kingdom) “Epigenetic Regulation of Epidermal Development and Differentiation” 11:50 am – 12:00 pm Discussion 12:00 pm – 12:10 pm Aiko Sada (Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, University of Tsukuba, Japan) “Stem Cell Lineages of the Interfollicular Epidermis” 12:10 pm – 12:15 pm Discussion 12:15 pm – 12:25 pm Sangbum Park (Yale University, USA) “Coordination of Tissue Homeostasis and Wound Repair Mechanisms in Live Mice” 12:25 pm – 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Free Time 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Power Hour The GRC Power Hour is an optional informal gathering open to all meeting participants. It is designed to help address the challenges women face in science and support the professional growth of women in our communities by providing an open forum for discussion and mentoring. Organizers: Fiona Watt (King’s College London, United Kingdom) and Jane Visvader (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Australia) 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Poster Session 6:00 pm Dinner 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm Epithelial Stem Cells in Translation Discussion Leaders: Michele De Luca (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) and Andrea Flesken-Nikitin (Cornell University, USA) 7:30 pm – 7:55 pm Michele De Luca (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) “Epidermal Stem-Mediated Combined Cell and Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Epidermolysis Bullosa” 7:55 pm – 8:05 pm Discussion 8:05 pm – 8:25 pm Graziella Pellegrini (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) “Regenerative Medicine by Corneal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Niches” 8:25 pm – 8:30 pm Discussion 8:30 pm – 8:50 pm Nadia Zakaria (Universitaire Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, Belgium) “Collagen Analogs as Scaffolds for Corneal Regeneration” 8:50 pm – 9:00 pm Discussion 9:00 pm – 9:10 pm Catherine Lu (The Rockefeller University, USA) “Identification of Adult Stem Cells in Eccrine Sweat Glands: Wound Repair and Regeneration” 9:10 pm – 9:15 pm Discussion 9:15 pm – 9:25 pm Clare Weeden (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Australia) “Airway Basal Stem Cells Use Error-Prone DNA Repair in Response to DNA Damaging Agents” 9:25 pm – 9:30 pm Discussion Tuesday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am – 12:30 pm Hair Follicle Stem Cells Discussion Leaders: George Cotsarelis (University of Pennsylvania, USA) and Xinhong Lim (Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore) 9:00 am – 9:25 am George Cotsarelis (University of Pennsylvania, USA) “Bulge Stem Cells in Mouse and Human Hair Follicles” 9:25 am – 9:35 am Discussion 9:35 am – 9:55 am Sung-Jan Lin (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) “Environmental Regulation of Hair Follicle Neogenesis and Regeneration” 9:55 am – 10:00 am Discussion 10:00 am – 10:30 am Coffee Break 10:30 am – 10:50 am Tudorita Doina Tumbar (Cornell University, USA) “Genetic and Epigenetic Control of Stem Cell Dynamics in and out the Niche” 10:50 am – 11:00 am Discussion 11:00 am – 11:20 am Ting Chen (National Institute of Biological Sciences, China) “How to Build a Functional Niche with Stem Cells” 11:20 am – 11:30 am Discussion 11:30 am – 11:50 am Michael Rendl (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA) “Regulation of Hair Follicle Formation, Growth and Regeneration by the Mesenchymal Niche” 11:50 am – 12:00 pm Discussion 12:00 pm – 12:10 pm Isaac Brownell (National Cancer Institute, NIH, USA) “The Perineural Niche as a Regulator of Cutaneous Stem Cells” 12:10 pm – 12:15 pm Discussion 12:15 pm – 12:25 pm Kenneth Lay (The Rockefeller University, USA) “Foxc1 Governs Hair Follicle Stem Cell Quiescence and Niche Maintenance to Preserve Long-Term Tissue-Regenerating Potential” 12:25 pm – 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Poster Session 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Lung Stem Cells Discussion Leaders: Brigid Hogan (Duke University, USA) and Nan Tang (National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing, China) 4:00 pm – 4:25 pm Brigid Hogan (Duke University, USA) “Lung Stem/Progenitor Cells and Their Niche During Homeostasis and Repair” 4:25 pm – 4:35 pm Discussion 4:35 pm – 4:55 pm Barry Stripp (Cedars Sinai Medical Center, USA) “Progenitor Cell Fate in Airway Repair” 4:55 pm – 5:05 pm Discussion 5:05 pm – 5:25 pm Joo-Hyeon Lee (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom) “Regulatory Crosstalk in Lineage Specification of Epithelial Cells During Lung Repair and Regeneration” 5:25 pm – 5:30 pm Discussion 5:30 pm – 5:40 pm Ian Driver (University of California, San Francisco, USA) “Single Cell Profiling of Adult Lung Heterogeneity: Identification of Novel Cell Types Involved in Regeneration and Disease” 5:40 pm – 5:45 pm Discussion 5:45 pm – 5:55 pm Rui Zhao (Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, USA) “Tissue Logic in the Airway Epithelium: Plasticity and Regulation” 5:55 pm – 6:00 pm Discussion 6:00 pm Dinner Wednesday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am – 12:30 pm Intestinal Stem Cells Discussion Leaders: Bruce Edgar (Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah Health Care, USA) and Zhengquan Yu (China Agricultural University, China) 9:00 am – 9:25 am Bruce Edgar (Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah Health Care, USA) “Regenerative and Tumorigenic Growth of Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cells” 9:25 am – 9:35 am Discussion 9:35 am – 9:55 am Tony Ip (University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA) “The Conserved Misshapen-Yorkie Pathway in Drosophila Intestinal Homeostasis” 9:55 am – 10:05 am Discussion 10:05 am – 10:35 am Coffee Break 10:35 am – 10:55 am Heinrich Jasper (Buck Institute for Research on Aging, USA) “Age-Related Stem Cell Dysfunction: Lessons from Drosophila” 10:55 am – 11:05 am Discussion 11:05 am – 11:25 am Rongwen Xi (National Institute of Biological Sciences, China) “Fate Specification and Maintenance in the Midgut Stem Cell Lineages” 11:25 am – 11:35 am Discussion 11:35 am – 11:55 am Nozomi Nishimura (Cornell University, USA) “In Vivo Imaging of Stem Cells in the Mouse Intestine and Beyond” 11:55 am – 12:05 pm Discussion 12:05 pm – 12:25 pm Lucy O’Brien (Stanford University, USA) “Motile Stem Cells Exhibit Tissue-Level Spatial Order During Steady-State Organ Renewal but Not Adaptive Organ Growth” 12:25 pm – 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Free Time 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Poster Session 6:00 pm Dinner 7:00 pm – 7:30 pm Business Meeting Nominations for the Next Vice Chair; Fill in Conference Evaluation Forms; Discuss Future Site and Scheduling Preferences; Election of the Next Vice Chair 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm Epithelial Stem Cells of Oral and Craniofacial Complex Discussion Leaders: Ophir Klein (University of California, San Francisco, USA) and Tsung-Lin Yang (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) 7:30 pm – 7:50 pm Ophir Klein (University of California, San Francisco, USA) “Dynamics of Oral and Dental Epithelial Stem Cells During Homeostasis and Regeneration” 7:50 pm – 8:00 pm Discussion 8:00 pm – 8:20 pm Catherine Ovitt (University of Rochester, USA) “Finding a Role for Stem Cells in Salivary Gland Homeostasis” 8:20 pm – 8:30 pm Discussion 8:30 pm – 8:50 pm Yang Chai (University of Southern California, USA) “Molecular Regulation of the Dental Epithelial Stem Cell Niche” 8:50 pm – 9:00 pm Discussion 9:00 pm – 9:10 pm Maria Alcolea (Wellcome Trust/MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, United Kingdom) “Cell Fate Imbalance in the Oesophageal Epithelium: Mutant Cell Competition” 9:10 pm – 9:15 pm Discussion 9:15 pm – 9:25 pm Sarah Knox (University of California, San Francisco, USA) “Peripheral Nerves Selectively Establish, Maintain and Replenish Salivary Gland Architecture via SOX2” 9:25 pm – 9:30 pm Discussion Thursday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am – 12:30 pm Mammary, Prostate, and Ovarian Stem Cells Discussion Leaders: Michael Shen (Columbia University Medical Center, USA) and Chang Liu (Columbia University, USA) 9:00 am – 9:25 am Michael Shen (Columbia University Medical Center, USA) “Progenitor Cells and the Origin of Prostate Cancer” 9:25 am – 9:35 am Discussion 9:35 am – 9:55 am Li Xin (Baylor College of Medicine, USA) “Prostate Epithelial Lineage Hierarchy” 9:55 am – 10:00 am Discussion 10:00 am – 10:30 am Coffee Break 10:30 am – 10:50 am Arial Zeng (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) “Procr Stem Cells in Mammary Development and Cancer” 10:50 am – 11:00 am Discussion 11:00 am – 11:20 am Allan Spradling (Carnegie Institution for Science / Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA) “Controlling the Onset of Epithelial Differentiation Downstream from the Stem Cell” 11:20 am – 11:30 am Discussion 11:30 am – 11:50 am Jane Visvader (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Australia) “Mapping Stem and Progenitor Cells During Development and Tumorigenesis” 11:50 am – 12:00 pm Discussion 12:00 pm – 12:10 pm Qiang Lan (Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Finland) “Cellular Behavior of Mammary Progenitor Cells During Embryonic Mammary Gland Development” 12:10 pm – 12:15 pm Discussion 12:15 pm – 12:25 pm Winnie Shum (ShanghaiTech University, China) “Epithelial Cellular Communication for a Congenial Niche in Excurrent Duct” 12:25 pm – 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Free Time 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Stem Cells of Transitional Zones Discussion Leaders: Alexander Nikitin (Cornell University, USA) and Guy Lyons (Centenary Institute, Australia) 4:00 pm – 4:25 pm Alexander Nikitin (Cornell University, USA) “Transitional Zones, Stem Cells and Cancer” 4:25 pm – 4:30 pm Discussion 4:30 pm – 4:50 pm Geraldine Guasch (Institut Paoli Calmettes, Cancer Research Center of Marseille, France) “Transitional Epithelium: Merging Microenvironment and Cellular Transformation” 4:50 pm – 4:55 pm Discussion 4:55 pm – 5:15 pm Yusuke Yamamoto (National Cancer Center Research Institute, Japan) “Enemies from Within: Stem Cells of Metaplastic Precursors of Highly Lethal Cancers” 5:15 pm – 5:20 pm Discussion 5:20 pm – 5:30 pm Joana Neves (Buck Institute for Research on Aging, USA) “Immune Modulation by MANF Promotes Tissue Repair and Regenerative Success in the Retina” 5:30 pm – 5:35 pm Discussion 5:35 pm – 5:45 pm Jeff Mumm (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, USA) “Innate Immune System Regulation of Retinal Regeneration” 5:45 pm – 5:50 pm Discussion 5:50 pm – 6:00 pm Closing Remarks 6:00 pm Dinner Friday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am Departure

Read the original here:
Tissue Niches & Resident Stem Cells in Adult Epithelia – GRC

Posted in Pennsylvania Stem Cells | Comments Off on Tissue Niches & Resident Stem Cells in Adult Epithelia – GRC

Five years after Michigan vote on human embryonic stem …

Posted: at 1:47 pm

ANN ARBOR, Mich. Five years ago this month, Michigan voters opened the door for a full range of stem cell research in the state. Today, that effort is well under way at the University of Michigan, and yielding results that are expanding knowledge of a wide range of diseases.

The Michigan ballot initiative approved in 2008 amended the state constitution, and allowed for the first time the production of new human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines in Michigan.

Since that approval, U-M founded what is now known as the MStem Cell Laboratories, based in the Medical School, to derive hESCs using donated embryos that would otherwise have been discarded by couples undergoing fertility treatment.

U-M also established a framework and oversight panel to guide this work under the appropriate state and federal statutes and regulations.

In less than three years, the research has flourished, and researchers from U-M and other institutions are able to use U-M-derived hESCs in their work.

At the same time, a broad range of other stem cell research continues at U-M, including research on adult and induced pluripotent stem cells, cancer stem cells, and treatments and clinical trials based on delivering stem cells into the body. This includes a Phase II clinical trial investigating the use of stem cells in patients with Lou Gehrigs disease.

Weve been working hard to do what the people of Michigan asked us to do — and were starting to see benefits in terms of scientific discoveries being made, says Gary Smith, Ph.D., who directs the MStem Cell lab and is a professor of obstetrics and gynecology; molecular and integrative physiology; and urology. He notes that hESC work and other types of stem cell work complement one another.

Key facts about human embryonic stem cell research at U-M since 2008s vote:

See the original post here:
Five years after Michigan vote on human embryonic stem …

Posted in Michigan Stem Cells | Comments Off on Five years after Michigan vote on human embryonic stem …

Stem Cell Conferences | Cell and Stem Cell Congress | Stem …

Posted: at 1:46 pm

On behalf of the organizing committee, it is my distinct pleasure to invite you to attend the Stem Cell Congress-2017. After the success of the Cell Science-2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, Conference series.LLC is proud to announce the 6th World Congress and expo on Cell & Stem Cell Research (Stem Cell Congress-2017) which is going to be held during March 20-22, 2017, Orlando, Florida, USA. The theme of Stem Cell Congress-2017 is Explore and Exploit the Novel Techniques in Cell and Stem Cell Research.

This annual Cell Science conference brings together domain experts, researchers, clinicians, industry representatives, postdoctoral fellows and students from around the world, providing them with the opportunity to report, share, and discuss scientific questions, achievements, and challenges in the field.

Examples of the diverse cell science and stem cell topics that will be covered in this comprehensive conference include Cell differentiation and development, Cell metabolism, Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, Stem cell therapy, Cell and gene therapy, Novel stem cell technologies, Stem cell and cancer biology, Stem cell treatment, Tendency in cell biology of aging and Apoptosis and cancer disease, Drugs and clinical developments. The meeting will focus on basic cell mechanism studies, clinical research advances, and recent breakthroughs in cell and stem cell research. With the support of many emerging technologies, dramatic progress has been made in these areas. In Stem Cell Congress-2017, you will be able to share experiences and research results, discuss challenges encountered and solutions adopted and have opportunities to establish productive new academic and industry research collaborations.

In association with the Stem Cell Congress-2017 conference, we will invite those selected to present at the meeting to publish a manuscript from their talk in the journal Cell Science with a significantly discounted publication charge. Please join us in Philadelphia for an exciting all-encompassing annual Stem Cell get together with the theme of better understanding from basic cell mechanisms to latest Stem Cell breakthroughs!

Haval Shirwan, Ph.D. Executive Editor, Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology Dr. Michael and Joan Hamilton Endowed Chair in Autoimmune Disease Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology Director, Molecular Immunomodulation Program, Institute for Cellular Therapeutics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

Track01:Stem Cells

The most well-established and widely used stem cell treatment is thetransplantationof blood stem cells to treat diseases and conditions of the blood and immune system, or to restore the blood system after treatments for specific cancers. Since the 1970s,skin stem cellshave been used to grow skin grafts for patients with severe burns on very large areas of the body. Only a few clinical centers are able to carry out this treatment and it is usually reserved for patients with life-threatening burns. It is also not a perfect solution: the new skin has no hair follicles or sweat glands. Research aimed at improving the technique is ongoing.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

7thAnnual Conference on Stem Cell and Regenerative MedicineAug 4-5, 2016, Manchester, UK;2nd InternationalConference on AntibodiesJuly 14-15, 2016 Philadelphia, USA; 2nd InternationalConference on Innate ImmunityJuly 21-22, 2016 Berlin, Germany; 2ndInternational Congress on Neuroimmunology March 31-April 02, 2016 Atlanta, USA; InternationalConference on Cancer Immunology July 28-30, 2016 Melbourne, Australia; 5th InternationalConference on ImmunologyOctober 24-26, 2016 Chicago, USA;Cancer Vaccines: Targeting Cancer Genes for Immunotherapy, Mar 610 2016, Whistler, Canada;Systems Immunology: From Molecular Networks to Human Biology, Jan 1014 2016, Big Sky, USA;Novel Immunotherapeutics Summit, Jan 2526 2016, San Diego, USA;Stromal Cells in Immunity, Feb 711 2016, Keystone, USA; 26th European Congress ofClinical Microbiology, April 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey

Track 02: Stem Cell Banking:

Stem Cell Banking is a facility that preserves stem cells derived from amniotic fluid for future use. Stem cell samples in private or family banks are preserved precisely for use by the individual person from whom such cells have been collected and the banking costs are paid by such person. The sample can later be retrieved only by that individual and for the use by such individual or, in many cases, by his or her first-degree blood relatives.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

8thWorld Congress on Stem Cell ResearchMarch 20-22, 2017 Orlando, USAInternationalConference on Cancer ImmunologyJuly 28-30, 2016 Melbourne, Australia; 5th InternationalConference on ImmunologyOctober 24-26, 2016 Chicago, USA;Cancer Vaccines: Targeting Cancer Genes for Immunotherapy, Mar 610 2016, Whistler, Canada;Systems Immunology: From Molecular Networks to Human Biology, Jan 1014 2016, Big Sky, USA;Novel Immunotherapeutics Summit, Jan 2526 2016, San Diego, USA;Stromal Cells in Immunity, Feb 711 2016, Keystone, USA; 26th European Congress ofClinical Microbiology, April 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey

Track 03: Stem Cell Therapy:

Autologous cells are obtained from one’s own body, just as one may bank his or her own blood for elective surgical procedures. Adult stem cells are frequently used in medical therapies, for example in bone marrow transplantation. Human embryonic stem cells may be grown in vivo and stimulated to produce pancreatic -cells and later transplanted to the patient. Its success depends on response of the patients immune system and ability of the transplanted cells to proliferate, differentiate and integrate with the target tissue.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

4th InternationalConference on Plant GenomicsJuly 14-15, 2016 Brisbane, Australia; 8thWorld Congress on Stem Cell ResearchMarch 20-22, 2017 Orlando, USA; 7thAnnual Conference on Stem Cell and Regenerative MedicineAug 4-5, 2016, Manchester, UK; 2nd InternationalConference on Tissue preservation and BiobankingSeptember 12-13, 2016 Philadelphia, USA, USA;World Congress on Human GeneticsOctober 31- November 02, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 12thEuro Biotechnology CongressNovember 7-9, 2016 Alicante, Spain; 2nd InternationalConference on Germplasm of Ornamentals, Aug 8-12, 2016, Atlanta, USA; 7th Internationalconference on Crop Science, Aug 1419 2016, Beijing, China;Plant Epigenetics: From Genotype to Phenotype, Feb 1519 2016, Taos, USA;Germline Stem Cells Conference, June 1921 2016, San Francisco, USA;Conference on Water Stressin Plants, 29 May 3 June 2016, Ormont-Dessus, Switzerland

Track 04: Novel Stem Cell Technologies:

Stem cell technology is a rapidly developing field that combines the efforts of cell biologists, geneticists, and clinicians and offers hope of effective treatment for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases. Stem cells are defined as totipotent progenitor cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Stem cells survive well and show stable division in culture, making them ideal targets for in vitro manipulation. Although early research has focused on haematopoietic stem cells, stem cells have also been recognised in other sites. Research into solid tissue stem cells has not made the same progress as that on haematopoietic stem cells.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

InternationalConference on Next Generation SequencingJuly 21-22, 2016 Berlin, Germany; 5th InternationalConference on Computational Systems BiologyAugust 22-23, 2016 Philadelphia, USA; 7th InternationalConference on BioinformaticsOctober 27-28, 2016 Chicago, USA; InternationalConference on Synthetic BiologySeptember 28-30, 2015 Houston, USA; 4th InternationalConference on Integrative BiologyJuly 18-20, 2016 Berlin, Germany; 1st InternationalConference on Pharmaceutical BioinformaticsJan 2426 2016, Pattaya, Thailand; EMBL Conference: TheEpitranscriptome, Apr 2022 2016, Heidelberg, Germany; 2016Whole-Cell ModelingSummer School, Apr 38 2016, Barcelona, Spain; 3rd InternationalMolecular Pathological Epidemiology, May 1213 2016, Boston, USA; 5thDrug FormulationSummit, Jan 2527 2016, Philadelphia, USA

Track 05: Stem Cell Treatment:

Bone marrow transplant is the most extensively used stem-cell treatment, but some treatment derived from umbilical cord blood are also in use. Research is underway to develop various sources for stem cells, and to apply stem-cell treatments for neurodegenerative diseases and conditions, diabetes, heart disease, and other conditions.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

7th InternationalConference on BioinformaticsOctober 27-28, 2016 Chicago, USA; InternationalConference on Synthetic BiologySeptember 28-30, 2015 Houston, USA; 7thAnnual Conference on Stem Cell and Regenerative MedicineAug 4-5, 2016, Manchester, UK; 4th InternationalConference on Integrative BiologyJuly 18-20, 2016 Berlin, Germany; 1st InternationalConference on Pharmaceutical BioinformaticsJan 2426 2016, Pattaya, Thailand; EMBL Conference: TheEpitranscriptome, Apr 2022 2016, Heidelberg, Germany; 2016Whole-Cell ModelingSummer School, Apr 38 2016, Barcelona, Spain; 3rd InternationalMolecular Pathological Epidemiology, May 1213 2016, Boston, USA; 5thDrug FormulationSummit, Jan 2527 2016, Philadelphia, USA

Track 06: Stem cell apoptosis and signal transduction:

Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that may occur in multicellular organisms. Biochemical events lead to characteristic cell changes (morphology) and death. These changes include blebbing, cell shrinkage, nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, chromosomal DNA fragmentation, and global mRNA decay. Most cytotoxic anticancer agents induce apoptosis, raising the intriguing possibility that defects in apoptotic programs contribute to treatment failure. Because the same mutations that suppress apoptosis during tumor development also reduce treatment sensitivity, apoptosis provides a conceptual framework to link cancer genetics with cancer therapy.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

InternationalConference on Restorative MedicineOctober 24-26, 2016 Chicago, USA;; 3rdWorld Congress onHepatitis and Liver Diseases October 17-19, 2016 Dubai, UAE; InternationalConference on Molecular BiologyOctober 13-15, 2016 Dubai, UAE; 2nd InternationalConference on Tissue preservation and Biobanking September12-13, 2016 Philadelphia USA; 26thEuropean Congress ofClinical Microbiology, April 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey;Conference onCell Growth and Regeneration, Jan 1014 2016, Breckenridge, USA ;

Track 07: Stem Cell Biomarkers:

Molecular biomarkers serve as valuable tools to classify and isolate embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and to monitor their differentiation state by antibody-based techniques. ESCs can give rise to any adult cell type and thus offer enormous potential for regenerative medicine and drug discovery. A number of biomarkers, such as certain cell surface antigens, are used to assign pluripotent ESCs; however, accumulating evidence suggests that ESCs are heterogeneous in morphology, phenotype and function, thereby classified into subpopulations characterized by multiple sets of molecular biomarkers.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

8thWorld Congress on Stem Cell ResearchMarch 20-22, 2017 Orlando, USA; 5th International Conference onCell and Gene TherapyMay 19-21, 2016 San Antonio, USA; 7thAnnual Conference on Stem Cell and Regenerative MedicineAug 4-5, 2016, Manchester, UK; InternationalConference on Restorative MedicineOctober 24-26, 2016 Chicago, USA; InternationalConference on Molecular BiologyOctober 13-15, 2016 Dubai, UAE; 2nd InternationalConference on Tissue preservation and Biobanking September12-13, 2016 Philadelphia USA;Conference on Cardiac Development, Regeneration and RepairApril 3 7, 2016 Snowbird, Utah, USA; Stem Cell DevelopmentMay 22-26, 2016 Hillerd, Denmark; Conference onHematopoietic Stem Cells, June 3-5, 2016 Heidelberg, Germany; ISSCR Pluripotency – March 22-24, 2016 Kyoto, Japan

Track 08: Cellular therapies:

Cellular therapy also called Cell therapy is therapy in which cellular material is injected into a patient, this generally means intact, living cells. For example, T cells capable of fighting cancer cells via cell-mediated immunity may be injected in the course of immunotherapy.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

InternationalConference on Genetic Counseling and Genomic MedicineAugust 11-12, 2016 Birmingham, UK;World Congress on Human GeneticsOctober 31- November 02, 2016 Valencia, Spain; InternationalConference on Molecular BiologyOctober 13-15, 2016 Dubai, UAE; 3rd InternationalConference on Genomics & PharmacogenomicsSeptember 21-23, 2015 San Antonio, USA; EuropeanConference on Genomics and Personalized MedicineApril 25-27, 2016 Valencia, Spain;Genomics and Personalized Medicine, Feb 711 2016, Banff, Canada; Drug Discovery for Parasitic Diseases, Jan 2428 2016, Tahoe City, USA; Heart Failure: Genetics,Genomics and Epigenetics, April 37 2016, Snowbird, USA; Understanding the Function ofHuman Genome Variation, May 31 June 4 2016, Uppsala, Sweden; 5thDrug Formulation SummitJan2527,2016,Philadelphia, USA

Track 09: Stem cells and cancer:

Cancer can be defined as a disease in which a group of abnormal cells grow uncontrollably by disregarding the normal rules of cell division. Normal cells are constantly subject to signals that dictate whether the cells should divide, differentiate into another cell or die. Cancer cells develop a degree of anatomy from these signals, resulting in uncontrolled growth and proliferation. If this proliferation is allowed to continue and spread, it can be fatal.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

2ndWorld Congress on Applied MicrobiologyOctober 31-November 02, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey; InternationalConference on Infectious Diseases & Diagnostic MicrobiologyOct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada;18th International conference on Neuroscience, April 26 2016, Sweden, Austria; 6th Annual Traumatic Brain Injury Conference, May 1112 2016, Washington, D.C., USA; Common Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration, June 1216 2016, Keystone, USA; Neurology Caribbean Cruise, Aug 2128 2016, Fort Lauderdale, USA; Annual Meeting of the German Society ofNeurosurgery(DGNC), June 1215 2016, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Track 10: Embryonic stem cells:

Embryonic stem cells have a major potential for studying early steps of development and for use in cell therapy. In many situations, however, it will be necessary to genetically engineer these cells. A novel generation of lentivectors which permit easy genetic engineering of mouse and human embryonic stem cells.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

4thCongress on Bacteriology and Infectious DiseasesMay 16-18, 2016 San Antonio, USA; 2ndWorld Congress on Applied MicrobiologyOctober 31-November 02, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey; InternationalConference on Infectious Diseases & Diagnostic MicrobiologyOct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; InternationalConference on Water MicrobiologyJuly 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 5th InternationalConference on Clinical MicrobiologyOctober 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; Axons: FromCell Biologyto Pathology Conference, 2427 January 2016, Santa Fe, USA; 26th EuropeanCongress of Clinical MicrobiologyApril 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey;Conference on Gut Microbiota, Metabolic Disorders and Beyond, April 1721 2016, Newport, USA; 7th EuropeanSpores Conference, April 1820 2016, Egham, UK; New Approaches to Vaccines forHuman and Veterinary Tropical Diseases, May 2226 2016, Cape Town, South Africa

Track 11: Cell differentiation and disease modeling:

Cellular differentiation is the progression, whereas a cell changes from one cell type to another. Variation occurs numerous times during the development of a multicellular organism as it changes from a simple zygote to a complex system of tissues and cell types. Differentiation continues in adulthood as adult stem cells divide and create fully differentiated daughter cells during tissue repair and during normal cell turnover. Some differentiation occurs in response to antigen exposure. Differentiation dramatically changes a cell’s size, shape, membrane potential, metabolic activity, and responsiveness to signals. These changes are largely due to highly controlled modifications in gene expression and are the study of epigenetics. With a few exceptions, cellular differentiationalmost never involves a change in the DNA sequence itself. Thus, different cells can have very different physical characteristics despite having the same genome.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

4thCongress on Bacteriology and Infectious DiseasesMay 16-18, 2016 San Antonio, USA; 2ndWorld Congress on Applied MicrobiologyOctober 31-November 02, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey; InternationalConference on Infectious Diseases & Diagnostic MicrobiologyOct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; InternationalConference on Water MicrobiologyJuly 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 5thInternationalConference on Clinical MicrobiologyOctober 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; Axons: FromCell Biologyto Pathology Conference, 2427 January 2016, Santa Fe, USA; 26thEuropeanCongress of Clinical MicrobiologyApril 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey;Conference on Gut Microbiota, Metabolic Disorders and Beyond, April 1721 2016, Newport, USA; 7thEuropeanSpores Conference, April 1820 2016, Egham, UK; New Approaches toVaccines forHuman and Veterinary Tropical Diseases, May 2226 2016, Cape Town, South Africa

Track 12: Tissue engineering:

Tissue Engineering is the study of the growth of new connective tissues, or organs, from cells and a collagenous scaffold to produce a fully functional organ for implantation back into the donor host. Powerful developments in the multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering have produced a novel set of tissue replacement parts and implementation approaches. Scientific advances in biomaterials, stem cells, growth and differentiation factors, and biomimetic environments have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in the laboratory from combinations of engineered extracellular matrices cells, and biologically active molecules.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

4thCongress on Bacteriology and Infectious DiseasesMay 16-18, 2016 San Antonio, USA; 2ndWorld Congress on Applied MicrobiologyOctober 31-November 02, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey; InternationalConference on Infectious Diseases & Diagnostic MicrobiologyOct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; InternationalConference on Water MicrobiologyJuly 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 5thInternationalConference on Clinical MicrobiologyOctober 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; Axons: FromCell Biologyto Pathology Conference, 2427 January 2016, Santa Fe, USA; 26thEuropeanCongress of Clinical MicrobiologyApril 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey;Conference on Gut Microbiota, Metabolic Disorders and Beyond, April 1721 2016, Newport, USA; 7thEuropeanSpores Conference, April 1820 2016, Egham, UK; New Approaches toVaccines forHuman and Veterinary Tropical Diseases, May 2226 2016, Cape Town, South Africa

Track 13: Stem cell plasticity and reprogramming:

Stem cell plasticity denotes to the potential of stem cells to give rise to cell types, previously considered outside their normal repertoire of differentiation for the location where they are found. Included under this umbrella title is often the process of transdifferentiation the conversion of one differentiated cell type into another, and metaplasia the conversion of one tissue type into another. From the point of view of this entry, some metaplasias have a clinical significance because they predispose individuals to the development of cancer.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

InternationalConference on Case ReportsMarch 31-April 02, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 2nd International Meeting onClinical Case ReportsApril 18-20, 2016 Dubai, UAE; 3rd Experts Meeting onMedical Case ReportsMay 09-11, 2016 New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; 12thEuro BiotechnologyCongress November 7-9, 2016 Alicante, Spain; 2nd International Conference onTissue preservation and BiobankingSeptember 12-13, 2016 Philadelphia, USA; 11thWorld Conference BioethicsOctober 20-22, 2015 Naples, Italy;Annual Conference Health Law and Bioethics, May 6-7 2016 Cambridge, MA, USA; 27th Maclean Conference on Clinical Medical Ethics, Nov 13-14, 2015, Chicago, USA; CFP: Global Forum on Bioethics in Research, Nov 3-4, 2015, Annecy, France

Track 14: Gene therapy and stem cells

Gene therapy is the therapeutic delivery of nucleic acid polymers into a patient’s cells as a drug to treat disease. Gene therapy could be a way to fix a genetic problem at its source. The polymers are either expressed as proteins, interfere with protein expression, or possibly correct genetic mutations. In the future, this technique may allow doctors to treat a disorder by inserting a gene into a patient’s cells instead of using drugs or surgery.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

Track 15: Tumour cell science:

An abnormal mass of tissue. Tumors are a classic sign of inflammation, and can be benign or malignant. Tomour usually reflect the kind of tissue they arise in. Treatment is also specific to the location and type of the tumor. Benign tumors can sometimes simply be ignored, cancerous tumors; options include chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

Track 16: Reprogramming stem cells: computational biology

Computational Biology, sometimes referred to as bioinformatics, is the science of using biological data to develop algorithms and relations among various biological systems. Bioinformatics groups use computational methods to explore the molecular mechanisms underpinning stem cells. To accomplish this bioinformaticsdevelop and apply advanced analysis techniques that make it possible to dissect complex collections of data from a wide range of technologies and sources.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

The fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine research are fundamentally about understanding dynamic cellular processes such as development, reprogramming, repair, differentiation and the loss, acquisition or maintenance of pluripotency. In order to precisely decipher these processes at a molecular level, it is critical to identify and study key regulatory genes and transcriptional circuits. Modern high-throughput molecular profiling technologies provide a powerful approach to addressing these questions as they allow the profiling of tens of thousands of gene products in a single experiment. Whereas bioinformatics is used to interpret the information produced by such technologies.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

8th World Congress on Cell & Stem Cell Research

The success of the 7 Cell Science conferences series has given us the prospect to bring the gathering one more time for our 8thWorld Congress 2017 meet in Orlando, USA. Since its commencement in 2011 cell science series has perceived around 750 researchers of great potentials and outstanding research presentations around the globe. The awareness of stem cells and its application is increasing among the general population that also in parallel offers hope and add woes to the researchers of cell science due to the potential limitations experienced in the real-time.

Stem Cell Research-2017has the goal to fill the prevailing gaps in the transformation of this science of hope to promptly serve solutions to all in the need.World Congress 2017 will have an anticipated participation of 100-120 delegates from around the world to discuss the conference goal.

History of Stem cells Research

Stem cells have an interesting history, in the mid-1800s it was revealed that cells were basically the building blocks of life and that some cells had the ability to produce other cells. Efforts were made to fertilize mammalian eggs outside of the human body and in the early 1900s, it was discovered that some cells had the capacity to generate blood cells. In 1968, the first bone marrow transplant was achieved successfully to treat two siblings with severe combined immunodeficiency. Other significant events in stem cell research include:

1978: Stem cells were discovered in human cord blood 1981: First in vitro stem cell line developed from mice 1988: Embryonic stem cell lines created from a hamster 1995: First embryonic stem cell line derived from a primate 1997: Cloned lamb from stem cells 1997: Leukaemia origin found as haematopoietic stem cell, indicating possible proof of cancer stem cells

Funding in USA:

No federal law forever did embargo stem cell research in the United States, but only placed restrictions on funding and use, under Congress’s power to spend. By executive order on March 9, 2009, President Barack Obama removed certain restrictions on federal funding for research involving new lines of humanembryonic stem cells. Prior to President Obama’s executive order, federal funding was limited to non-embryonic stem cell research and embryonic stem cell research based uponembryonic stem celllines in existence prior to August 9, 2001. In 2011, a United States District Court “threw out a lawsuit that challenged the use of federal funds for embryonic stem cell research.

Members Associated with Stem Cell Research:

Discussion on Development, Regeneration, and Stem Cell Biology takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the fundamental question of how a single cell, the fertilized egg, ultimately produces a complex fully patterned adult organism, as well as the intimately related question of how adult structures regenerate. Stem cells play critical roles both during embryonic development and in later renewal and repair. More than 65 faculties in Philadelphia from both basic science and clinical departments in the Division of Biological Sciences belong to Development, Regeneration, and Stem Cell Biology. Their research uses traditional model species including nematode worms, fruit-flies, Arabidopsis, zebrafish, amphibians, chick and mouse as well as non-traditional model systems such as lampreys and cephalopods. Areas of research focus include stem cell biology, regeneration, developmental genetics, and cellular basis of development, developmental neurobiology, and evo-devo (Evolutionary developmental biology).

Stem Cell Market Value:

Worldwide many companies are developing and marketing specialized cell culture media, cell separation products, instruments and other reagents for life sciences research. We are providing a unique platform for the discussions between academia and business.

Global Tissue Engineering & Cell Therapy Market, By Region, 2009 2018

$Million

Why to attend???

Stem Cell Research-2017 could be an outstanding event that brings along a novel and International mixture of researchers, doctors, leading universities and stem cell analysis establishments creating the conference an ideal platform to share knowledge, adoptive collaborations across trade and world, and assess rising technologies across the world. World-renowned speakers, the most recent techniques, tactics, and the newest updates in cell science fields are assurances of this conference.

A Unique Opportunity for Advertisers and Sponsors at this International event:

http://stemcell.omicsgroup.com/sponsors.php

UAS Major Universities which deals with Stem Cell Research

University of Washington/Hutchinson Cancer Center

Oregon Stem Cell Center

University of California Davis

University of California San Francisco

University of California Berkeley

Stanford University

Mayo Clinic

Major Stem Cell Organization Worldwide:

Norwegian Center for Stem Cell Research

View post:
Stem Cell Conferences | Cell and Stem Cell Congress | Stem …

Posted in Louisiana Stem Cells | Comments Off on Stem Cell Conferences | Cell and Stem Cell Congress | Stem …

Adipose vs. Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Loveland, CO

Posted: August 25, 2016 at 1:49 am

As more providers are offering stem cell options, more patients are becoming aware of the wonderful opportunities forhealing provided by stem cell injections. However, not all stem cells are equivalent. It is helpful to review a few pointsthat will help patients decide which type of stem cell therapy offers the best chance of achieving their particular healthgoal.

1) Autologus versus Allogenic

Stem cells are living cells that serve a particular purpose in the body. When injecting (transplanting) these cell into atreatment area, we are asking them to perform their usual function in an area of the body different from where theymay have been obtained.

Allogeneic stem cells are cells derived from a person other than the patient into whom they are being transplanted.These might be derived from bone marrow, placenta, fat or any other tissue of another individual that are thentransplanted into the patient. Given that we are asking living cells to perform their usual function, it is understandablethat they are sensitive to changes in their environment that can affect their comfort level. The greater the change inenvironment, the greater the challenge for cell survival and efficacy.

It is important to consider that an individual acting as a tissue donor for stem cell isolation most likely has a verydifferent physiologic milieu than the patient receiving the stem cells. The donors gender, dietary habits, hormonalstatus, exposure to environmental and dietary toxins may differ from the patients status. Thus, the cells beingintroduced into the patients body are not in familiar territory and are more likely to suffer stress and may not survive,let alone function well.

Hence, it seems natural that the most logical choice between Autologous or Allogenic should be Autologous, i.e. thepatients own cells for transplant.

2) Bone Marrow versus Adipose derived

Stem cells are born in the same fashion as other blood cells. Therefore, it is not surprising that they are born in bonemarrow where other blood cells are generated. It is also not surprising that bone marrow was one of the first placeswhere stem cells were first discovered as well as the source used by many in bench science and applied medicine forisolating stem cells. However, stem cells are only born in bone marrow that is not their final destination.

Stem cells are involved in the healing cascade that is required for repair of most bodily injuries that occur in the courseof normal life. That healing cascade seems to be stimulated by bleeding, which makes a whole lot of sense. There canbe very little injury to the body that does not induce bleeding. That is because there are small blood vessels throughoutour body, and mechanical injury should necessarily involve damage to these vessels. Blood, while it is in the vascularsystem, is a normal thing for the body blood outside of blood vessels is not: it indicates injury. And there appear to bea number of systems activated by bleeding, all of which lead to healing.

One of these is the response of platelets. Many have learned in High School Biology that platelets induce clotting when there is bleeding. As noted above, bleeding seems to be a signal in the body that indicates injury. So it is not surprisingthen that science has found that platelets ALSO release a host of growth factors when they are activated to form a bloodclot growth factors being signaling molecules that signal to other cells the need for healing processes to occur. Thesehealing processes lead to repair of damaged structures including bone, ligament, cartilage, skin and other tissues.

Stem cells, back to the subject at hand, are also part of this bleeding-induced healing process. Once born in bonemarrow, stem cells migrate out of the marrow and circulate in the blood, leaving the blood to take up their position aspericytes. Pericytes are cells that are located on the outside of blood vessels. They literally attach themselves to theoutsides of blood vessels, both small and large. These cells then wait for activation by processes that affect the bloodvessels including disruption/injury that leads to bleeding. When bleeding is induced, stem cells on adjacent/affectedblood vessels are activated. Once activated, their contribution to healing is that they will generate NEW CELLS of thesame type as the tissue that has been injured. They literally replace the damaged tissue with new cells as they performthis process.

It is not surprising to find that there are MANY small blood vessels in adipose, or fat tissue. This tissue is a storage organ.It requires blood vessels to transport fat to it from the body if there has been an excessive supply of nutrients in dietaryform for deposition as stored fat. It ALSO requires lots of blood vessels to supply fat for use if and when the bodyindicates a need for the fat that has been stored. Not surprisingly then, there are LOTS of small blood vessels in fat. Andall of these are lined with stem cells.

According to Stem Cell Scientist Kristin Komella, there are 500 times more stem cells available from the same amount offat as there are from bone marrow.But wait it gets better (in the case of adipose derived stem cells). As it turns out, not all stem cells act the same. Thereis a specific line of stem cells, CD34 cells that seem to be the most beneficial in terms of the healing in which mostpatients are interested. The proportion of those cells in adipose-derived stem cells is far higher than that in bonemarrow. Bottom line: not only are there 500 times more stem cells available from adipose as compared to bonemarrow, but there are vastly higher proportions of the most active stem cells in adipose derived stem cells as comparedto bone marrow derived.

Bottom line: autologous and adipose-derived stem cells would seem to be the obvious choice when considering stemcell transplant therapy.- Patrick Mallory DO

At Mallory Family Wellness, you are our priority. With advanced training in Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine, we dont just treat the symptoms. We treat the whole person to address the root of the problem. And well work with you so you can prevent illness and remain healthy.

See for yourself why families from Loveland, Fort Collins, and the surrounding Northern Colorado communities, as well as Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, come to us. You can count on us to provide optimal care for your optimal health!

Read more:
Adipose vs. Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Loveland, CO

Posted in North Dakota Stem Cells | Comments Off on Adipose vs. Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Loveland, CO

Page 11234..1020..»