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Autologous Stem Cell Transplant – Nebraska Med

Posted: August 27, 2016 at 3:46 pm

Stem cells are unique cells located in bone marrow or peripheral blood that can develop into red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The goal of cancer treatments such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy is to destroy cancer cells. Unfortunately bone marrow and other healthy cells are damaged in the process. In an autologous stem cell transplant, bone marrow stem cells are removed from the patient’s own body prior to cancer treatment in order to protect them.

Stem cells can be collected in two ways. The primary method involves collection of stem cells from the peripheral blood. For this procedure, medication is given a few days prior to collection to encourage stem cells to leave the bone marrow and enter the blood. Blood is then withdrawn from one arm and circulated through an apheresis machine, or a “cell separator,” where the stem cells are removed. The remaining blood components are returned through the catheter in the other arm.

If this method does not provide enough stem cells, they may be taken directly from bone marrow. To harvest stem cells from bone marrow, the physician will use a special syringe to retrieve the bone marrow from the hip bone. Once removed, the bone marrow is processed to remove the stem cells.

After being removed from the blood, stem cells are frozen. Following cancer treatment, the stem cells are thawed and then drawn into a syringe so they can be returned or “transplanted” back into the body through a central line. In the first two weeks following the procedure, the immune system will be compromised and transfusions of platelets and red blood cells will be necessary. During this time, the stem cells begin producing new blood cells and restoring bone marrow. Close monitoring is necessary to ensure the bone marrow and immune system are functioning effectively.

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Autologous Stem Cell Transplant – Nebraska Med

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Tissue Niches & Resident Stem Cells in Adult Epithelia – GRC

Posted: August 26, 2016 at 1:49 pm

Sunday 2:00 pm – 8:00 pm Arrival and Check-in 6:00 pm Dinner 7:30 pm – 7:40 pm Welcome / Introductory Comments by GRC Site Staff 7:40 pm – 9:30 pm Keynote Session: Signaling Unity Within Epithelial Stem Cell Diversity Discussion Leader: Allan Spradling (Carnegie Institution for Science / Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA) 7:40 pm – 7:50 pm Opening Remarks 7:50 pm – 7:55 pm Introduction by Discussion Leader 7:55 pm – 8:35 pm Roeland Nusse (Stanford University, USA) “Stem Cells in Liver Homeostasis” 8:35 pm – 8:45 pm Discussion 8:45 pm – 9:25 pm Fiona Watt (King’s College London, United Kingdom) “In Vitro Approaches to Analyze the Epidermal Stem Cell Niche” 9:25 pm – 9:30 pm Discussion Monday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am – 12:30 pm Epithelial Stem Cells and Their Skin Niches Discussion Leaders: Fiona Watt (King’s College London, United Kingdom) and Xiaoyang Wu (University of Chicago, USA) 9:00 am – 9:05 am Introduction by Discussion Leader 9:05 am – 9:25 am Howard Chang (Stanford University, USA) “RNA World and Regulation of Gene Expression” 9:25 am – 9:35 am Discussion 9:35 am – 9:55 am Pritinder Kaur (Curtin University, Australia) “MSC-Like Dermal Pericytes Influence Epidermal Renewal by Promoting Symmetric Keratinocyte Cell Divisions” 9:55 am – 10:00 am Discussion 10:00 am – 10:30 am Group Photo / Coffee Break 10:30 am – 10:50 am Valerie Horsley (Yale University, USA) “Adipocytes as Niche Cells in Epithelial Tissues” 10:50 am – 11:00 am Discussion 11:00 am – 11:20 am Xing Dai (University of California, Irvine, USA) “Keeping Skin and Mammary Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells Epithelial” 11:20 am – 11:30 am Discussion 11:30 am – 11:50 am Vladimir Botchkarev (Boston University, USA / University of Bradford, United Kingdom) “Epigenetic Regulation of Epidermal Development and Differentiation” 11:50 am – 12:00 pm Discussion 12:00 pm – 12:10 pm Aiko Sada (Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, University of Tsukuba, Japan) “Stem Cell Lineages of the Interfollicular Epidermis” 12:10 pm – 12:15 pm Discussion 12:15 pm – 12:25 pm Sangbum Park (Yale University, USA) “Coordination of Tissue Homeostasis and Wound Repair Mechanisms in Live Mice” 12:25 pm – 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Free Time 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Power Hour The GRC Power Hour is an optional informal gathering open to all meeting participants. It is designed to help address the challenges women face in science and support the professional growth of women in our communities by providing an open forum for discussion and mentoring. Organizers: Fiona Watt (King’s College London, United Kingdom) and Jane Visvader (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Australia) 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Poster Session 6:00 pm Dinner 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm Epithelial Stem Cells in Translation Discussion Leaders: Michele De Luca (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) and Andrea Flesken-Nikitin (Cornell University, USA) 7:30 pm – 7:55 pm Michele De Luca (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) “Epidermal Stem-Mediated Combined Cell and Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Epidermolysis Bullosa” 7:55 pm – 8:05 pm Discussion 8:05 pm – 8:25 pm Graziella Pellegrini (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) “Regenerative Medicine by Corneal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Niches” 8:25 pm – 8:30 pm Discussion 8:30 pm – 8:50 pm Nadia Zakaria (Universitaire Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, Belgium) “Collagen Analogs as Scaffolds for Corneal Regeneration” 8:50 pm – 9:00 pm Discussion 9:00 pm – 9:10 pm Catherine Lu (The Rockefeller University, USA) “Identification of Adult Stem Cells in Eccrine Sweat Glands: Wound Repair and Regeneration” 9:10 pm – 9:15 pm Discussion 9:15 pm – 9:25 pm Clare Weeden (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Australia) “Airway Basal Stem Cells Use Error-Prone DNA Repair in Response to DNA Damaging Agents” 9:25 pm – 9:30 pm Discussion Tuesday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am – 12:30 pm Hair Follicle Stem Cells Discussion Leaders: George Cotsarelis (University of Pennsylvania, USA) and Xinhong Lim (Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore) 9:00 am – 9:25 am George Cotsarelis (University of Pennsylvania, USA) “Bulge Stem Cells in Mouse and Human Hair Follicles” 9:25 am – 9:35 am Discussion 9:35 am – 9:55 am Sung-Jan Lin (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) “Environmental Regulation of Hair Follicle Neogenesis and Regeneration” 9:55 am – 10:00 am Discussion 10:00 am – 10:30 am Coffee Break 10:30 am – 10:50 am Tudorita Doina Tumbar (Cornell University, USA) “Genetic and Epigenetic Control of Stem Cell Dynamics in and out the Niche” 10:50 am – 11:00 am Discussion 11:00 am – 11:20 am Ting Chen (National Institute of Biological Sciences, China) “How to Build a Functional Niche with Stem Cells” 11:20 am – 11:30 am Discussion 11:30 am – 11:50 am Michael Rendl (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, USA) “Regulation of Hair Follicle Formation, Growth and Regeneration by the Mesenchymal Niche” 11:50 am – 12:00 pm Discussion 12:00 pm – 12:10 pm Isaac Brownell (National Cancer Institute, NIH, USA) “The Perineural Niche as a Regulator of Cutaneous Stem Cells” 12:10 pm – 12:15 pm Discussion 12:15 pm – 12:25 pm Kenneth Lay (The Rockefeller University, USA) “Foxc1 Governs Hair Follicle Stem Cell Quiescence and Niche Maintenance to Preserve Long-Term Tissue-Regenerating Potential” 12:25 pm – 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Poster Session 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Lung Stem Cells Discussion Leaders: Brigid Hogan (Duke University, USA) and Nan Tang (National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing, China) 4:00 pm – 4:25 pm Brigid Hogan (Duke University, USA) “Lung Stem/Progenitor Cells and Their Niche During Homeostasis and Repair” 4:25 pm – 4:35 pm Discussion 4:35 pm – 4:55 pm Barry Stripp (Cedars Sinai Medical Center, USA) “Progenitor Cell Fate in Airway Repair” 4:55 pm – 5:05 pm Discussion 5:05 pm – 5:25 pm Joo-Hyeon Lee (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom) “Regulatory Crosstalk in Lineage Specification of Epithelial Cells During Lung Repair and Regeneration” 5:25 pm – 5:30 pm Discussion 5:30 pm – 5:40 pm Ian Driver (University of California, San Francisco, USA) “Single Cell Profiling of Adult Lung Heterogeneity: Identification of Novel Cell Types Involved in Regeneration and Disease” 5:40 pm – 5:45 pm Discussion 5:45 pm – 5:55 pm Rui Zhao (Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, USA) “Tissue Logic in the Airway Epithelium: Plasticity and Regulation” 5:55 pm – 6:00 pm Discussion 6:00 pm Dinner Wednesday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am – 12:30 pm Intestinal Stem Cells Discussion Leaders: Bruce Edgar (Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah Health Care, USA) and Zhengquan Yu (China Agricultural University, China) 9:00 am – 9:25 am Bruce Edgar (Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah Health Care, USA) “Regenerative and Tumorigenic Growth of Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cells” 9:25 am – 9:35 am Discussion 9:35 am – 9:55 am Tony Ip (University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA) “The Conserved Misshapen-Yorkie Pathway in Drosophila Intestinal Homeostasis” 9:55 am – 10:05 am Discussion 10:05 am – 10:35 am Coffee Break 10:35 am – 10:55 am Heinrich Jasper (Buck Institute for Research on Aging, USA) “Age-Related Stem Cell Dysfunction: Lessons from Drosophila” 10:55 am – 11:05 am Discussion 11:05 am – 11:25 am Rongwen Xi (National Institute of Biological Sciences, China) “Fate Specification and Maintenance in the Midgut Stem Cell Lineages” 11:25 am – 11:35 am Discussion 11:35 am – 11:55 am Nozomi Nishimura (Cornell University, USA) “In Vivo Imaging of Stem Cells in the Mouse Intestine and Beyond” 11:55 am – 12:05 pm Discussion 12:05 pm – 12:25 pm Lucy O’Brien (Stanford University, USA) “Motile Stem Cells Exhibit Tissue-Level Spatial Order During Steady-State Organ Renewal but Not Adaptive Organ Growth” 12:25 pm – 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Free Time 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Poster Session 6:00 pm Dinner 7:00 pm – 7:30 pm Business Meeting Nominations for the Next Vice Chair; Fill in Conference Evaluation Forms; Discuss Future Site and Scheduling Preferences; Election of the Next Vice Chair 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm Epithelial Stem Cells of Oral and Craniofacial Complex Discussion Leaders: Ophir Klein (University of California, San Francisco, USA) and Tsung-Lin Yang (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) 7:30 pm – 7:50 pm Ophir Klein (University of California, San Francisco, USA) “Dynamics of Oral and Dental Epithelial Stem Cells During Homeostasis and Regeneration” 7:50 pm – 8:00 pm Discussion 8:00 pm – 8:20 pm Catherine Ovitt (University of Rochester, USA) “Finding a Role for Stem Cells in Salivary Gland Homeostasis” 8:20 pm – 8:30 pm Discussion 8:30 pm – 8:50 pm Yang Chai (University of Southern California, USA) “Molecular Regulation of the Dental Epithelial Stem Cell Niche” 8:50 pm – 9:00 pm Discussion 9:00 pm – 9:10 pm Maria Alcolea (Wellcome Trust/MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, United Kingdom) “Cell Fate Imbalance in the Oesophageal Epithelium: Mutant Cell Competition” 9:10 pm – 9:15 pm Discussion 9:15 pm – 9:25 pm Sarah Knox (University of California, San Francisco, USA) “Peripheral Nerves Selectively Establish, Maintain and Replenish Salivary Gland Architecture via SOX2” 9:25 pm – 9:30 pm Discussion Thursday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am – 12:30 pm Mammary, Prostate, and Ovarian Stem Cells Discussion Leaders: Michael Shen (Columbia University Medical Center, USA) and Chang Liu (Columbia University, USA) 9:00 am – 9:25 am Michael Shen (Columbia University Medical Center, USA) “Progenitor Cells and the Origin of Prostate Cancer” 9:25 am – 9:35 am Discussion 9:35 am – 9:55 am Li Xin (Baylor College of Medicine, USA) “Prostate Epithelial Lineage Hierarchy” 9:55 am – 10:00 am Discussion 10:00 am – 10:30 am Coffee Break 10:30 am – 10:50 am Arial Zeng (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) “Procr Stem Cells in Mammary Development and Cancer” 10:50 am – 11:00 am Discussion 11:00 am – 11:20 am Allan Spradling (Carnegie Institution for Science / Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA) “Controlling the Onset of Epithelial Differentiation Downstream from the Stem Cell” 11:20 am – 11:30 am Discussion 11:30 am – 11:50 am Jane Visvader (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Australia) “Mapping Stem and Progenitor Cells During Development and Tumorigenesis” 11:50 am – 12:00 pm Discussion 12:00 pm – 12:10 pm Qiang Lan (Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Finland) “Cellular Behavior of Mammary Progenitor Cells During Embryonic Mammary Gland Development” 12:10 pm – 12:15 pm Discussion 12:15 pm – 12:25 pm Winnie Shum (ShanghaiTech University, China) “Epithelial Cellular Communication for a Congenial Niche in Excurrent Duct” 12:25 pm – 12:30 pm Discussion 12:30 pm Lunch 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm Free Time 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Stem Cells of Transitional Zones Discussion Leaders: Alexander Nikitin (Cornell University, USA) and Guy Lyons (Centenary Institute, Australia) 4:00 pm – 4:25 pm Alexander Nikitin (Cornell University, USA) “Transitional Zones, Stem Cells and Cancer” 4:25 pm – 4:30 pm Discussion 4:30 pm – 4:50 pm Geraldine Guasch (Institut Paoli Calmettes, Cancer Research Center of Marseille, France) “Transitional Epithelium: Merging Microenvironment and Cellular Transformation” 4:50 pm – 4:55 pm Discussion 4:55 pm – 5:15 pm Yusuke Yamamoto (National Cancer Center Research Institute, Japan) “Enemies from Within: Stem Cells of Metaplastic Precursors of Highly Lethal Cancers” 5:15 pm – 5:20 pm Discussion 5:20 pm – 5:30 pm Joana Neves (Buck Institute for Research on Aging, USA) “Immune Modulation by MANF Promotes Tissue Repair and Regenerative Success in the Retina” 5:30 pm – 5:35 pm Discussion 5:35 pm – 5:45 pm Jeff Mumm (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, USA) “Innate Immune System Regulation of Retinal Regeneration” 5:45 pm – 5:50 pm Discussion 5:50 pm – 6:00 pm Closing Remarks 6:00 pm Dinner Friday 7:30 am – 8:30 am Breakfast 9:00 am Departure

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Tissue Niches & Resident Stem Cells in Adult Epithelia – GRC

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Five years after Michigan vote on human embryonic stem …

Posted: at 1:47 pm

ANN ARBOR, Mich. Five years ago this month, Michigan voters opened the door for a full range of stem cell research in the state. Today, that effort is well under way at the University of Michigan, and yielding results that are expanding knowledge of a wide range of diseases.

The Michigan ballot initiative approved in 2008 amended the state constitution, and allowed for the first time the production of new human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines in Michigan.

Since that approval, U-M founded what is now known as the MStem Cell Laboratories, based in the Medical School, to derive hESCs using donated embryos that would otherwise have been discarded by couples undergoing fertility treatment.

U-M also established a framework and oversight panel to guide this work under the appropriate state and federal statutes and regulations.

In less than three years, the research has flourished, and researchers from U-M and other institutions are able to use U-M-derived hESCs in their work.

At the same time, a broad range of other stem cell research continues at U-M, including research on adult and induced pluripotent stem cells, cancer stem cells, and treatments and clinical trials based on delivering stem cells into the body. This includes a Phase II clinical trial investigating the use of stem cells in patients with Lou Gehrigs disease.

Weve been working hard to do what the people of Michigan asked us to do — and were starting to see benefits in terms of scientific discoveries being made, says Gary Smith, Ph.D., who directs the MStem Cell lab and is a professor of obstetrics and gynecology; molecular and integrative physiology; and urology. He notes that hESC work and other types of stem cell work complement one another.

Key facts about human embryonic stem cell research at U-M since 2008s vote:

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Five years after Michigan vote on human embryonic stem …

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Stem Cell Conferences | Cell and Stem Cell Congress | Stem …

Posted: at 1:46 pm

On behalf of the organizing committee, it is my distinct pleasure to invite you to attend the Stem Cell Congress-2017. After the success of the Cell Science-2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, Conference series.LLC is proud to announce the 6th World Congress and expo on Cell & Stem Cell Research (Stem Cell Congress-2017) which is going to be held during March 20-22, 2017, Orlando, Florida, USA. The theme of Stem Cell Congress-2017 is Explore and Exploit the Novel Techniques in Cell and Stem Cell Research.

This annual Cell Science conference brings together domain experts, researchers, clinicians, industry representatives, postdoctoral fellows and students from around the world, providing them with the opportunity to report, share, and discuss scientific questions, achievements, and challenges in the field.

Examples of the diverse cell science and stem cell topics that will be covered in this comprehensive conference include Cell differentiation and development, Cell metabolism, Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, Stem cell therapy, Cell and gene therapy, Novel stem cell technologies, Stem cell and cancer biology, Stem cell treatment, Tendency in cell biology of aging and Apoptosis and cancer disease, Drugs and clinical developments. The meeting will focus on basic cell mechanism studies, clinical research advances, and recent breakthroughs in cell and stem cell research. With the support of many emerging technologies, dramatic progress has been made in these areas. In Stem Cell Congress-2017, you will be able to share experiences and research results, discuss challenges encountered and solutions adopted and have opportunities to establish productive new academic and industry research collaborations.

In association with the Stem Cell Congress-2017 conference, we will invite those selected to present at the meeting to publish a manuscript from their talk in the journal Cell Science with a significantly discounted publication charge. Please join us in Philadelphia for an exciting all-encompassing annual Stem Cell get together with the theme of better understanding from basic cell mechanisms to latest Stem Cell breakthroughs!

Haval Shirwan, Ph.D. Executive Editor, Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology Dr. Michael and Joan Hamilton Endowed Chair in Autoimmune Disease Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology Director, Molecular Immunomodulation Program, Institute for Cellular Therapeutics, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

Track01:Stem Cells

The most well-established and widely used stem cell treatment is thetransplantationof blood stem cells to treat diseases and conditions of the blood and immune system, or to restore the blood system after treatments for specific cancers. Since the 1970s,skin stem cellshave been used to grow skin grafts for patients with severe burns on very large areas of the body. Only a few clinical centers are able to carry out this treatment and it is usually reserved for patients with life-threatening burns. It is also not a perfect solution: the new skin has no hair follicles or sweat glands. Research aimed at improving the technique is ongoing.

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Track 02: Stem Cell Banking:

Stem Cell Banking is a facility that preserves stem cells derived from amniotic fluid for future use. Stem cell samples in private or family banks are preserved precisely for use by the individual person from whom such cells have been collected and the banking costs are paid by such person. The sample can later be retrieved only by that individual and for the use by such individual or, in many cases, by his or her first-degree blood relatives.

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Track 03: Stem Cell Therapy:

Autologous cells are obtained from one’s own body, just as one may bank his or her own blood for elective surgical procedures. Adult stem cells are frequently used in medical therapies, for example in bone marrow transplantation. Human embryonic stem cells may be grown in vivo and stimulated to produce pancreatic -cells and later transplanted to the patient. Its success depends on response of the patients immune system and ability of the transplanted cells to proliferate, differentiate and integrate with the target tissue.

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Track 04: Novel Stem Cell Technologies:

Stem cell technology is a rapidly developing field that combines the efforts of cell biologists, geneticists, and clinicians and offers hope of effective treatment for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases. Stem cells are defined as totipotent progenitor cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Stem cells survive well and show stable division in culture, making them ideal targets for in vitro manipulation. Although early research has focused on haematopoietic stem cells, stem cells have also been recognised in other sites. Research into solid tissue stem cells has not made the same progress as that on haematopoietic stem cells.

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Track 05: Stem Cell Treatment:

Bone marrow transplant is the most extensively used stem-cell treatment, but some treatment derived from umbilical cord blood are also in use. Research is underway to develop various sources for stem cells, and to apply stem-cell treatments for neurodegenerative diseases and conditions, diabetes, heart disease, and other conditions.

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Track 06: Stem cell apoptosis and signal transduction:

Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that may occur in multicellular organisms. Biochemical events lead to characteristic cell changes (morphology) and death. These changes include blebbing, cell shrinkage, nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, chromosomal DNA fragmentation, and global mRNA decay. Most cytotoxic anticancer agents induce apoptosis, raising the intriguing possibility that defects in apoptotic programs contribute to treatment failure. Because the same mutations that suppress apoptosis during tumor development also reduce treatment sensitivity, apoptosis provides a conceptual framework to link cancer genetics with cancer therapy.

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Track 07: Stem Cell Biomarkers:

Molecular biomarkers serve as valuable tools to classify and isolate embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and to monitor their differentiation state by antibody-based techniques. ESCs can give rise to any adult cell type and thus offer enormous potential for regenerative medicine and drug discovery. A number of biomarkers, such as certain cell surface antigens, are used to assign pluripotent ESCs; however, accumulating evidence suggests that ESCs are heterogeneous in morphology, phenotype and function, thereby classified into subpopulations characterized by multiple sets of molecular biomarkers.

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Track 08: Cellular therapies:

Cellular therapy also called Cell therapy is therapy in which cellular material is injected into a patient, this generally means intact, living cells. For example, T cells capable of fighting cancer cells via cell-mediated immunity may be injected in the course of immunotherapy.

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Track 09: Stem cells and cancer:

Cancer can be defined as a disease in which a group of abnormal cells grow uncontrollably by disregarding the normal rules of cell division. Normal cells are constantly subject to signals that dictate whether the cells should divide, differentiate into another cell or die. Cancer cells develop a degree of anatomy from these signals, resulting in uncontrolled growth and proliferation. If this proliferation is allowed to continue and spread, it can be fatal.

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Track 10: Embryonic stem cells:

Embryonic stem cells have a major potential for studying early steps of development and for use in cell therapy. In many situations, however, it will be necessary to genetically engineer these cells. A novel generation of lentivectors which permit easy genetic engineering of mouse and human embryonic stem cells.

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4thCongress on Bacteriology and Infectious DiseasesMay 16-18, 2016 San Antonio, USA; 2ndWorld Congress on Applied MicrobiologyOctober 31-November 02, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey; InternationalConference on Infectious Diseases & Diagnostic MicrobiologyOct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; InternationalConference on Water MicrobiologyJuly 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 5th InternationalConference on Clinical MicrobiologyOctober 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; Axons: FromCell Biologyto Pathology Conference, 2427 January 2016, Santa Fe, USA; 26th EuropeanCongress of Clinical MicrobiologyApril 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey;Conference on Gut Microbiota, Metabolic Disorders and Beyond, April 1721 2016, Newport, USA; 7th EuropeanSpores Conference, April 1820 2016, Egham, UK; New Approaches to Vaccines forHuman and Veterinary Tropical Diseases, May 2226 2016, Cape Town, South Africa

Track 11: Cell differentiation and disease modeling:

Cellular differentiation is the progression, whereas a cell changes from one cell type to another. Variation occurs numerous times during the development of a multicellular organism as it changes from a simple zygote to a complex system of tissues and cell types. Differentiation continues in adulthood as adult stem cells divide and create fully differentiated daughter cells during tissue repair and during normal cell turnover. Some differentiation occurs in response to antigen exposure. Differentiation dramatically changes a cell’s size, shape, membrane potential, metabolic activity, and responsiveness to signals. These changes are largely due to highly controlled modifications in gene expression and are the study of epigenetics. With a few exceptions, cellular differentiationalmost never involves a change in the DNA sequence itself. Thus, different cells can have very different physical characteristics despite having the same genome.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

4thCongress on Bacteriology and Infectious DiseasesMay 16-18, 2016 San Antonio, USA; 2ndWorld Congress on Applied MicrobiologyOctober 31-November 02, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey; InternationalConference on Infectious Diseases & Diagnostic MicrobiologyOct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; InternationalConference on Water MicrobiologyJuly 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 5thInternationalConference on Clinical MicrobiologyOctober 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; Axons: FromCell Biologyto Pathology Conference, 2427 January 2016, Santa Fe, USA; 26thEuropeanCongress of Clinical MicrobiologyApril 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey;Conference on Gut Microbiota, Metabolic Disorders and Beyond, April 1721 2016, Newport, USA; 7thEuropeanSpores Conference, April 1820 2016, Egham, UK; New Approaches toVaccines forHuman and Veterinary Tropical Diseases, May 2226 2016, Cape Town, South Africa

Track 12: Tissue engineering:

Tissue Engineering is the study of the growth of new connective tissues, or organs, from cells and a collagenous scaffold to produce a fully functional organ for implantation back into the donor host. Powerful developments in the multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering have produced a novel set of tissue replacement parts and implementation approaches. Scientific advances in biomaterials, stem cells, growth and differentiation factors, and biomimetic environments have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in the laboratory from combinations of engineered extracellular matrices cells, and biologically active molecules.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

4thCongress on Bacteriology and Infectious DiseasesMay 16-18, 2016 San Antonio, USA; 2ndWorld Congress on Applied MicrobiologyOctober 31-November 02, 2016 Istanbul, Turkey; InternationalConference on Infectious Diseases & Diagnostic MicrobiologyOct 3-5, 2016 Vancouver, Canada; InternationalConference on Water MicrobiologyJuly 18-20, 2016 Chicago, USA; 5thInternationalConference on Clinical MicrobiologyOctober 24-26, 2016 Rome, Italy; Axons: FromCell Biologyto Pathology Conference, 2427 January 2016, Santa Fe, USA; 26thEuropeanCongress of Clinical MicrobiologyApril 912 2016, Istanbul, Turkey;Conference on Gut Microbiota, Metabolic Disorders and Beyond, April 1721 2016, Newport, USA; 7thEuropeanSpores Conference, April 1820 2016, Egham, UK; New Approaches toVaccines forHuman and Veterinary Tropical Diseases, May 2226 2016, Cape Town, South Africa

Track 13: Stem cell plasticity and reprogramming:

Stem cell plasticity denotes to the potential of stem cells to give rise to cell types, previously considered outside their normal repertoire of differentiation for the location where they are found. Included under this umbrella title is often the process of transdifferentiation the conversion of one differentiated cell type into another, and metaplasia the conversion of one tissue type into another. From the point of view of this entry, some metaplasias have a clinical significance because they predispose individuals to the development of cancer.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

InternationalConference on Case ReportsMarch 31-April 02, 2016 Valencia, Spain; 2nd International Meeting onClinical Case ReportsApril 18-20, 2016 Dubai, UAE; 3rd Experts Meeting onMedical Case ReportsMay 09-11, 2016 New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; 12thEuro BiotechnologyCongress November 7-9, 2016 Alicante, Spain; 2nd International Conference onTissue preservation and BiobankingSeptember 12-13, 2016 Philadelphia, USA; 11thWorld Conference BioethicsOctober 20-22, 2015 Naples, Italy;Annual Conference Health Law and Bioethics, May 6-7 2016 Cambridge, MA, USA; 27th Maclean Conference on Clinical Medical Ethics, Nov 13-14, 2015, Chicago, USA; CFP: Global Forum on Bioethics in Research, Nov 3-4, 2015, Annecy, France

Track 14: Gene therapy and stem cells

Gene therapy is the therapeutic delivery of nucleic acid polymers into a patient’s cells as a drug to treat disease. Gene therapy could be a way to fix a genetic problem at its source. The polymers are either expressed as proteins, interfere with protein expression, or possibly correct genetic mutations. In the future, this technique may allow doctors to treat a disorder by inserting a gene into a patient’s cells instead of using drugs or surgery.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

Track 15: Tumour cell science:

An abnormal mass of tissue. Tumors are a classic sign of inflammation, and can be benign or malignant. Tomour usually reflect the kind of tissue they arise in. Treatment is also specific to the location and type of the tumor. Benign tumors can sometimes simply be ignored, cancerous tumors; options include chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

Track 16: Reprogramming stem cells: computational biology

Computational Biology, sometimes referred to as bioinformatics, is the science of using biological data to develop algorithms and relations among various biological systems. Bioinformatics groups use computational methods to explore the molecular mechanisms underpinning stem cells. To accomplish this bioinformaticsdevelop and apply advanced analysis techniques that make it possible to dissect complex collections of data from a wide range of technologies and sources.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

The fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine research are fundamentally about understanding dynamic cellular processes such as development, reprogramming, repair, differentiation and the loss, acquisition or maintenance of pluripotency. In order to precisely decipher these processes at a molecular level, it is critical to identify and study key regulatory genes and transcriptional circuits. Modern high-throughput molecular profiling technologies provide a powerful approach to addressing these questions as they allow the profiling of tens of thousands of gene products in a single experiment. Whereas bioinformatics is used to interpret the information produced by such technologies.

Related Stem Cell Conferences|Stem Cell Congress|Cell and Stem Cell Conferences|Conference Series LLC

8th World Congress on Cell & Stem Cell Research

The success of the 7 Cell Science conferences series has given us the prospect to bring the gathering one more time for our 8thWorld Congress 2017 meet in Orlando, USA. Since its commencement in 2011 cell science series has perceived around 750 researchers of great potentials and outstanding research presentations around the globe. The awareness of stem cells and its application is increasing among the general population that also in parallel offers hope and add woes to the researchers of cell science due to the potential limitations experienced in the real-time.

Stem Cell Research-2017has the goal to fill the prevailing gaps in the transformation of this science of hope to promptly serve solutions to all in the need.World Congress 2017 will have an anticipated participation of 100-120 delegates from around the world to discuss the conference goal.

History of Stem cells Research

Stem cells have an interesting history, in the mid-1800s it was revealed that cells were basically the building blocks of life and that some cells had the ability to produce other cells. Efforts were made to fertilize mammalian eggs outside of the human body and in the early 1900s, it was discovered that some cells had the capacity to generate blood cells. In 1968, the first bone marrow transplant was achieved successfully to treat two siblings with severe combined immunodeficiency. Other significant events in stem cell research include:

1978: Stem cells were discovered in human cord blood 1981: First in vitro stem cell line developed from mice 1988: Embryonic stem cell lines created from a hamster 1995: First embryonic stem cell line derived from a primate 1997: Cloned lamb from stem cells 1997: Leukaemia origin found as haematopoietic stem cell, indicating possible proof of cancer stem cells

Funding in USA:

No federal law forever did embargo stem cell research in the United States, but only placed restrictions on funding and use, under Congress’s power to spend. By executive order on March 9, 2009, President Barack Obama removed certain restrictions on federal funding for research involving new lines of humanembryonic stem cells. Prior to President Obama’s executive order, federal funding was limited to non-embryonic stem cell research and embryonic stem cell research based uponembryonic stem celllines in existence prior to August 9, 2001. In 2011, a United States District Court “threw out a lawsuit that challenged the use of federal funds for embryonic stem cell research.

Members Associated with Stem Cell Research:

Discussion on Development, Regeneration, and Stem Cell Biology takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the fundamental question of how a single cell, the fertilized egg, ultimately produces a complex fully patterned adult organism, as well as the intimately related question of how adult structures regenerate. Stem cells play critical roles both during embryonic development and in later renewal and repair. More than 65 faculties in Philadelphia from both basic science and clinical departments in the Division of Biological Sciences belong to Development, Regeneration, and Stem Cell Biology. Their research uses traditional model species including nematode worms, fruit-flies, Arabidopsis, zebrafish, amphibians, chick and mouse as well as non-traditional model systems such as lampreys and cephalopods. Areas of research focus include stem cell biology, regeneration, developmental genetics, and cellular basis of development, developmental neurobiology, and evo-devo (Evolutionary developmental biology).

Stem Cell Market Value:

Worldwide many companies are developing and marketing specialized cell culture media, cell separation products, instruments and other reagents for life sciences research. We are providing a unique platform for the discussions between academia and business.

Global Tissue Engineering & Cell Therapy Market, By Region, 2009 2018

$Million

Why to attend???

Stem Cell Research-2017 could be an outstanding event that brings along a novel and International mixture of researchers, doctors, leading universities and stem cell analysis establishments creating the conference an ideal platform to share knowledge, adoptive collaborations across trade and world, and assess rising technologies across the world. World-renowned speakers, the most recent techniques, tactics, and the newest updates in cell science fields are assurances of this conference.

A Unique Opportunity for Advertisers and Sponsors at this International event:

http://stemcell.omicsgroup.com/sponsors.php

UAS Major Universities which deals with Stem Cell Research

University of Washington/Hutchinson Cancer Center

Oregon Stem Cell Center

University of California Davis

University of California San Francisco

University of California Berkeley

Stanford University

Mayo Clinic

Major Stem Cell Organization Worldwide:

Norwegian Center for Stem Cell Research

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Adipose vs. Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Loveland, CO

Posted: August 25, 2016 at 1:49 am

As more providers are offering stem cell options, more patients are becoming aware of the wonderful opportunities forhealing provided by stem cell injections. However, not all stem cells are equivalent. It is helpful to review a few pointsthat will help patients decide which type of stem cell therapy offers the best chance of achieving their particular healthgoal.

1) Autologus versus Allogenic

Stem cells are living cells that serve a particular purpose in the body. When injecting (transplanting) these cell into atreatment area, we are asking them to perform their usual function in an area of the body different from where theymay have been obtained.

Allogeneic stem cells are cells derived from a person other than the patient into whom they are being transplanted.These might be derived from bone marrow, placenta, fat or any other tissue of another individual that are thentransplanted into the patient. Given that we are asking living cells to perform their usual function, it is understandablethat they are sensitive to changes in their environment that can affect their comfort level. The greater the change inenvironment, the greater the challenge for cell survival and efficacy.

It is important to consider that an individual acting as a tissue donor for stem cell isolation most likely has a verydifferent physiologic milieu than the patient receiving the stem cells. The donors gender, dietary habits, hormonalstatus, exposure to environmental and dietary toxins may differ from the patients status. Thus, the cells beingintroduced into the patients body are not in familiar territory and are more likely to suffer stress and may not survive,let alone function well.

Hence, it seems natural that the most logical choice between Autologous or Allogenic should be Autologous, i.e. thepatients own cells for transplant.

2) Bone Marrow versus Adipose derived

Stem cells are born in the same fashion as other blood cells. Therefore, it is not surprising that they are born in bonemarrow where other blood cells are generated. It is also not surprising that bone marrow was one of the first placeswhere stem cells were first discovered as well as the source used by many in bench science and applied medicine forisolating stem cells. However, stem cells are only born in bone marrow that is not their final destination.

Stem cells are involved in the healing cascade that is required for repair of most bodily injuries that occur in the courseof normal life. That healing cascade seems to be stimulated by bleeding, which makes a whole lot of sense. There canbe very little injury to the body that does not induce bleeding. That is because there are small blood vessels throughoutour body, and mechanical injury should necessarily involve damage to these vessels. Blood, while it is in the vascularsystem, is a normal thing for the body blood outside of blood vessels is not: it indicates injury. And there appear to bea number of systems activated by bleeding, all of which lead to healing.

One of these is the response of platelets. Many have learned in High School Biology that platelets induce clotting when there is bleeding. As noted above, bleeding seems to be a signal in the body that indicates injury. So it is not surprisingthen that science has found that platelets ALSO release a host of growth factors when they are activated to form a bloodclot growth factors being signaling molecules that signal to other cells the need for healing processes to occur. Thesehealing processes lead to repair of damaged structures including bone, ligament, cartilage, skin and other tissues.

Stem cells, back to the subject at hand, are also part of this bleeding-induced healing process. Once born in bonemarrow, stem cells migrate out of the marrow and circulate in the blood, leaving the blood to take up their position aspericytes. Pericytes are cells that are located on the outside of blood vessels. They literally attach themselves to theoutsides of blood vessels, both small and large. These cells then wait for activation by processes that affect the bloodvessels including disruption/injury that leads to bleeding. When bleeding is induced, stem cells on adjacent/affectedblood vessels are activated. Once activated, their contribution to healing is that they will generate NEW CELLS of thesame type as the tissue that has been injured. They literally replace the damaged tissue with new cells as they performthis process.

It is not surprising to find that there are MANY small blood vessels in adipose, or fat tissue. This tissue is a storage organ.It requires blood vessels to transport fat to it from the body if there has been an excessive supply of nutrients in dietaryform for deposition as stored fat. It ALSO requires lots of blood vessels to supply fat for use if and when the bodyindicates a need for the fat that has been stored. Not surprisingly then, there are LOTS of small blood vessels in fat. Andall of these are lined with stem cells.

According to Stem Cell Scientist Kristin Komella, there are 500 times more stem cells available from the same amount offat as there are from bone marrow.But wait it gets better (in the case of adipose derived stem cells). As it turns out, not all stem cells act the same. Thereis a specific line of stem cells, CD34 cells that seem to be the most beneficial in terms of the healing in which mostpatients are interested. The proportion of those cells in adipose-derived stem cells is far higher than that in bonemarrow. Bottom line: not only are there 500 times more stem cells available from adipose as compared to bonemarrow, but there are vastly higher proportions of the most active stem cells in adipose derived stem cells as comparedto bone marrow derived.

Bottom line: autologous and adipose-derived stem cells would seem to be the obvious choice when considering stemcell transplant therapy.- Patrick Mallory DO

At Mallory Family Wellness, you are our priority. With advanced training in Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine, we dont just treat the symptoms. We treat the whole person to address the root of the problem. And well work with you so you can prevent illness and remain healthy.

See for yourself why families from Loveland, Fort Collins, and the surrounding Northern Colorado communities, as well as Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, come to us. You can count on us to provide optimal care for your optimal health!

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Stem Cells in Mexico | Del Prado Stem Cell Center – Tijuana

Posted: at 1:49 am

At Del Prado Stem Cell Center we treat :Diabetes,Osteoarthritis,Parkinsons,Alzheimers disease,Dementia,Rheumatoid Arthritis,Chronic Obstructive disorder,Autoimmune Hepatitis,Macular Degeneration,Lupus,Multiple Sclerosis, Age Management,as well as sports injuries like Golfers, Pitchers and Tennis Elbow, Meniscus Tears, Achilles Tendonitis and more.

Del Prado Stem Cell Center is a bank of stem cells throughout Latin America that has formal recognition and certification of OSAC agency from the government of the United States as an institution that unites all requirements for international patients in stem cell therapy, thanks to the level of professionalism and safety handles, being the only institution in Mexico with that recognition by the United States government.

Treatment provided by Del Prado Stem Cell Center is performed atHospital Del Prado, Tijuanasleading health institutionwith 49 years of experience, offering personalized and humane service. We are very thorough inthe selection and performance ofourdoctors and offer nothing but the best treatment and facilities for Stem Cell Therapy treatment in Tijuana, Mexico.Adult Stem Cell Therapies are completely safe and non-invasive. StemCell therapy is evolvingour modern medical panorama were it can offer patients a completely new alternative to cure degenerative and terminal illnesses.

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Del Prado Stem Cell Center in Mexico

A procedure in which cells are taken from a donor (Mesenchymal Stem Cells) and administered to a patient.

Stem Cells in Mexico at Del Prado Hospital

For those patients who are eligible for stem cell disease treatment. Their Stem Cells can be obtained from their own fat tissue for later transplant.

Del Prado Medical Center Offering Stem Cell Therapy and Treatment in Tijuana Mexico

Hospital Del Prado is certified for Stem Cell treatment, certified specialists are on hand which have the training and follow adequate transplant protocol. In any case our specialists are on hand for an evaluation and if your disease has been approved we will immediately enter transplant protocol, which can begin right away in most cases, this is without need for Hospitalization for a prolonged period.

Del Parado Hospital in Tijuana Mexico

You are eligible as long as you have a preapproved illness or physical condition where stem cells have proved to be a clinical benefit in research

IMPORTANT NOTICE For Del Prado Stem Cell Center is very important to inform boththe medical community and society in general that stem cell therapyit may be unsuccessful in some cases or not recommended for all patients.Must never create false expectations without clinical and researchstudies to support the implementation of these treatments.So we suggest you talk to your doctor before receiving treatment.

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Hematologic Oncology Chicago, IL – MRMC | CTCA

Posted: at 1:48 am

“We are constantly looking for the best therapy for treating each patient and his or her particular disease. We monitor each patients treatment to see how he or she is responding to the treatment. Depending on how the patient responds, we may modify the treatment to find the one that optimizes that patients chances for eliminating the disease.”

-Dr. Istvan Redei, Chief, Division of Stem Cell Transplantation, Department of Medical Oncology

The Hematologic Oncology Department at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) provides advanced medical therapies, including stem cell transplantation, for patients with blood-related diseases, including leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

Our hematologic oncology team has expertise in treating hematologic diseases using advanced technology and a personalized approach. We use state-of-the-art diagnostic tests to develop an individualized treatment plan that’s tailored to your needs.

A stem cell transplant can be used to infuse healthy stem cells into the body to stimulate new bone marrow growth, suppress the disease and reduce the possibility of a relapse. Stem cells can be found in the bone marrow, circulating blood (peripheral blood stem cells) and umbilical cord blood.

For patients who need a stem cell transplant, our Stem Cell Unit includes an outpatient clinic, infusion center and inpatient rooms. When you first visit the hospital, youll meet with the hematologic oncology team. Your doctor will review your medical records and determine if you need additional diagnostic testing, such as lab work or imaging tests.

Once youve completed any necessary testing, your doctor will present you with treatment options, which may include autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplants.

The hematologic oncology team will care for you throughout your treatment. Youll stay in one of our private, inpatient rooms and receive around-the-clock monitoring and care. We’ll do everything possible to see that you and your family are comfortable throughout your stay.

Recovery from treatments like stem cell transplantation can take several months. Our hematology oncology team will work with the rest of your care team to support you throughout the entire process.

For example, your dietitian may recommend a healthy diet to nutritionally fortify your body, and your naturopathic clincian may recommend natural therapies to help reduce side effects, such as neuropathy. Your rehabilitation therapist may recommend safe levels of physical activity to help you stay active and independent.

Additionally, your pain management practitioner may use various techniques to help alleviate discomfort and control bone and neuropathic pain, while your mind-body therapist may provide counseling and relaxation techniques.

Dr. Istvan Redei serves as Director of the Stem Cell Transplant and Cell Therapy Program at CTCA at Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Midwestern).

Dr. Redei and his team, including Dr. Syed Abutalib, are dedicated to fighting hematologic malignancies with advanced and innovative medicine. They use leading treatment protocols and think “outside the box” to provide promising options and individualized care for each patient.

We are constantly looking for the best therapy for treating each patient and his or her particular disease, says Dr. Redei. We monitor each patients treatment to see how he or she is responding to the treatment. Depending on how the patient responds, we may modify the treatment to find the one that optimizes that patients chances for eliminating the disease.

FACT accreditation

In 2014, Midwestern was recognized by theFoundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT) at the University of Nebraska Medical Center for demonstrating compliance with the FACT-JACIE International Standards for Cellular Therapy Product Collection, Processing and Administration.

FACT, an internationally recognized accrediting body for hospitals and medical institutions offering stem cell transplant, awarded Midwestern with the prestigious accreditation for meeting rigorous standards in a variety of stem cell therapies, including clinical care, donor management, cell collection, processing, storage, transportation, administration and cell release.

FACT accreditation is attained through evaluation of detailed clinical documentation and an on-site inspection to determine if an organization is in compliance with current FACT standards and the United States Food and Drug Administration’s rules for Good Tissue Practice. Since 2007, FACT accreditation has been used in determining the U.S. News & World Report rankings of transplant centers for the “America’s Best Hospitals” list.

Dr. Redei says, “Receiving FACT accreditation is a great honor and demonstrates to patients they are in good hands.”

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NativeBees | Nebraska Extension: Acreage Insights …

Posted: August 23, 2016 at 8:44 pm

March – Native Bees

Barb Ogg, University of Nebraska – Extension Educator, shares her knowledge and expertise on insects that often are pest problems. This month, with help from Mary Jane Frogge and Soni Cochran, UNL Extension, she describes an insect that we shouldn’t consider a pest.

Encouraging Native Bee Pollinators

In the US, about 4,000 species of native bee pollinators have been identified. Because most of these bees do not live in a hive or colony, they often are overlooked. These bees collect pollen from flowering plants to feed their offspring and, in doing so, pollinate the plants they visit. They are more important pollinators today than ever before.

Native bees range in size from about 1/8- to more than 1-inch long. Coloration varies from dark brown or black to metallic green or blue; they may have stripes of red, white, orange, or yellow. Their names often reflect their nest building behaviors: plasterer bees, leafcutter bees, mason bees, digger bees, and carpenter bees.

Lifestyles. Bees can be divided into two groups by their lifestyles: solitary or social. The stereotypical image of a bee is one living in a hive, but only a few species of bees are social. Social bees share a nest and divide the work of building the nest, caring for the offspring, and foraging for pollen and nectar. The primary social bees are the honey bee (not native to the US) and the bumble bees (about 45 species in the US).

In contrast, most native pollinating bees – nearly 4,000 species in the U.S. – are solitary nesting bees. Each female creates and provisions her own nest, without cooperation with other bees. Although they may nest together in large numbers, the bees are only sharing a good nesting site. The photo to the left is of a leaf cutter bee that emerged from a stack of brood cells that were brought to the Lancaster County extension office last summer. The bee is about the same width as the brood cells. Females that emerge will find a deep hole about the width of their body, form a brood cell with a cut leaf circle and pack the cell with a pollen ball. After she lays an egg on the pollen ball, she seals off each cell and makes a new one.

Solitary bees are either stingless or very unlikely to sting.

Life Cycles Solitary bees. The life cycle of a solitary bee consists of four stages: egg, larva, pupa and adult. Adult bees build a brood cell, then collect pollen and form a pollen ball. The female lays an egg on the pollen ball and seals off the cell. The egg, which resembles a tiny white sausage, incubates for 1-3 weeks, then hatches into a white, soft-bodied, grub-like larva. The larva feeds on the pollen ball left in the cell by the mother bee. After feeding and growing quickly, the larva changes into a pupa. Within the pupal stage – which may last many months – the larva transforms into its adult bee form. When the adult bee emerges, it is ready to feed, mate, and continue the cycle.

About 30 percent of native bee species are wood-nesters. These species use the soft pithy centers of twigs or reeds, or holes in wood tunneled by wood-boring beetles. In the case of carpenter bees, the bees themselves create the tunnel in wood. Some other bee species tunnel into soft, above-ground rotting logs and stumps.

The other 70% of native bees nest underground. These bees tunnel into the soil and create small chambers – brood cells – under the surface.

Social bees. Bumble bees are important pollinators and are only native bees which are truly social. They live in colonies, share the work, and have overlapping generations throughout the spring, summer, and fall. However, unlike the non-native honey bee – which survives through the winter – the bumble bee colony is seasonal. At the end of the summer only the fertilized queens survive to hibernate through the winter. In the spring, she does not use the nest she grew up in, but searches for a new nest.

Bumble bees usually nest in the soil – an abandoned rodent burrow is a favorite location. The queen creates the first few brood cells out of wax she produces, and then provisions these cells with pollen and nectar and lays eggs. Bumble bees differ from solitary bees when feeding their larvae. They provide food gradually, adding it to the brood cells as the larvae need it – called progressive provisioning – rather than leaving all the food in the cell before laying the egg. In addition, bumble bees make a small amount of honey, just enough to feed the colony for a few days during bad weather.

It takes about a month for the queen to raise the first brood. When they emerge, these bees become workers – foraging and tending the growing number of brood cells. The queen will continue to lay eggs, so the colony will grow steadily through the summer. At the end of summer, new queens and drones will emerge and mate. As temperatures drop, the old bees, including the old queen, will die, leaving only the new, mated queens to overwinter.

Increase Pollinators in Your Landscape.

Pollinators require somewhere to nest and flowers from which to gather nectar and pollen. Three things you can do to enhance pollinators in your garden are: provide a range of native flowering plants that bloom throughout the growing season, create nest sites for native bees, and avoid using pesticides.

Plants for Food.

You can increase the number of pollinators in your area with a few simple additions to your landscape. Native plants are the best source of food for native pollinators, because plants and their pollinators have co-evolved, but many varieties of garden plants are also good.

Plant flowers in groups or mass plantings to increase pollination efficiency. Consider the bloom season to provide food from early spring to late fall. Many herbs and annuals, although not native, are very good for pollinators. Mint, dill, oregano, chives, and parsley are a few herbs you can plant. Zinnia, cosmos, and sunflowers are excellent annual flowers that attract bees and butterflies. Even weeds like common milkweed can be a source of food for pollinators. Consider plants that are suitable for the larval stages of pollinators, like butterflies. Here’s a table of plants to consider for attracting native bees to your Nebraska acreage.

Wood-Nesting and Cavity Nesting Bees.

Nesting blocks. You can make a bee block by drilling nesting holes between 3/32″ and 3/8″ in diameter, at approximate 3/4″ centers, into the side of a block of preservative-free lumber. A variety of hole sizes will attract different-sized pollinators. The holes must be very smooth inside and closed at one end. The height of the nest block isn’t terribly important – 8″ or more is good – but the depth of the holes is. Holes less than 1/4″ diameter should be about 3 – 4″ deep. Holes 1/4″ or larger should be 5 – 6″ deep. Nesting blocks should be placed in the landscape early to make sure it is there when the bee needs it. If you have a bee-filled block from last year, don’t clean it out until after the bees have emerged. You might want to add a second clean block for this year’s brood, leaving the old one until all the bees are emerged.

Logs and snags. Get some logs or old stumps and place them in sunny areas. Those with beetle tunnels are ideal. Plant a few upright, like dead trees to ensure some deadwood habitat stays dry. On the southeast side of each log, drill a range of holes, as outlined above.

Stem or tube bundles. Some plants, like bamboo and reeds have naturally hollow stems. Cut the stems into 6-8″ lengths. Be careful to cut the stems close to a stem not to create a tube with one end closed. Fifteen to twenty stem pieces tied into a bundle with all the stem ends closed on the same end makes a good nest. You can also make a wooden frame to hold as many stems as you fit inside.

Nest Location. The location of the nest is important. Nests should be placed in a sheltered location to protect them against severe weather, with the entrance holes facing east or southeast to get morning sun. Any height will work, but 3-6 feet is convenient. With stem bundles, make sure the stems are horizontal. Place them on a building, fence, stake, or in a tree. Make sure you fix them firmly so they don’t shake in the wind.

Ground Nesting Bees. If you have a large acreage you may be able to provide bare or patchy soil for ground-nesting bees. Simply clear the vegetation from some small patches of level or sloping ground and gently compact the soil surface. A south-facing slope is good. Different ground conditions – from sloping banks to flat ground – will draw different bee species.

Water. A clean reliable source of water is essential for pollinators. Water features such as bird baths and small ponds provide drinking and bathing opportunities for pollinators. Water sources should be shallow or have sloping sides so pollinators can easily approach the water without drowning.

No Pesticides. To protect pollinators, pesticide use must be avoided. This can be difficult for gardeners who have well manicured landscapes. Here are some tips to help you ease into a pesticide-free environment. * For natural pest control provide a diverse garden habitat with a variety of plant sizes, heights and types to encourage beneficial insects. * Lower expectations and accept a little bit of pest activity. * Remove garden pests by hand.

Sources: The Xerces Society, a nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat.

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Louisiana (Stem Cell) – what-when-how

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The state of Louisiana encourages the biotechnology industry, including adult stem cell research for economic development and scientific innovation. Growth in biotechnology and biomedicine for translating basic research into medical therapies is possible through appropriate legislation and funding, as well as strong collaborative networks for scientific research for industrial, academic, and clinical institutions throughout the state.

The Louisiana Alliance for Biotechnology provides networking opportunities between academic and commercial researchers to encourage economic growth and the transfer of basic research into commercially viable products. The Biomedi-cal Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana promotes regional scientific growth and development in coordination with Louisiana State University Medical Center in Shreveport.

The foundation operates the Biomedical Research Institute and a Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Center for diagnosis and research in various fields, including immunology, neurological and cardiovascular cellular communication, signal transduction, and neu-rosciences. The foundations clinical application is performed by the Center for Biotechnology Innovation with a focus on research in energy, photonics, biogenetics, orthopedics, and medical informatics. The foundation is also developing a research and technology park called the International Technology Center to focus on biomedical healthcare delivery and biotechnology. This effort brings together nine of the academic institutions in north Louisiana

Louisiana is the only U.S. state to specifically prohibit research on human embryos.

The Louisiana Gene Therapy Research Consortium was established in 2000 with funds given by the state of Louisiana for enhancing economic growth and innovation by attracting researchers, building research laboratories, and producing gene and cell therapies to be used in human clinical trials.

At present, no federal legislation in the United States is in place to regulate stem cell research (except by executive order to not allow federal funding for generation of new embryonic stem cell lines and limiting research on embryonic stem cell lines); this leaves each state responsible for determining policy and funding for stem cell research. Louisiana is the only state to specifically prohibit research on human embryos and restricts human embryonic stem cell research.

For expansion of the biotech industry in Louisiana, the division of economic development has set up three centers within the state, in Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and Davenport, to provide financial assistance with a small business investment company fund, business development services, and wet laboratory incubator space. Their financial support has allowed the creation of a Good Manufacturing Practice Laboratory for stem cell research and funding for the Louisiana Cancer Research Centers of New Orleans and for the Gene Therapy Research Consortium. They also work with start-up companies to bring to the marketplace the application of research from Louisiana universities.

Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge provides research laboratories and inpatient and outpatient medical clinics. The center opened in 1988 with funds provided by a philanthropic gift from C. B. Doc Pennington in 1980. The center is home to eight basic research laboratories, three clinical research units, 19 core service laboratories, and conference space.

The centers researchers specialize in a variety of disciplines including molecular biology, genom-ics and proteomics, and biochemistry. Though dedicated to nutrition and its related health issues, the centers research foci include tissue and organ regeneration postinjury/damage, characterization and biological mechanisms including formation of adult stem cells and adipose tissue, and the epigen-etic basis for human diseases of obesity, hypertension, and adult-onset diabetes.

Tulane University, in addition to providing education, is also a research university with active studies in biotechnology including vaccine and drug development, pain-control therapies, and gene therapy. Basic research is translated into clinical therapy and commercial products by the Office of Technology Development. In 2000 the university formed the Tulane Center for Gene Therapy with the goal of developing therapeutic treatment for a variety of human diseases, using adult stem cells through autologous donation and then turning them into therapy for osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, Parkinsons disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, and Alzheimers disease. The center also provides career development and community education, encouraging dialogue on social, legal, and ethical issues related to gene therapy. Funding for the center is provided through grant funding from national, state, and private sources, including the National Institutes of Health, the Louisiana Gene Therapy Research Consortium, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, Healthcare Company, and private foundations.

In addition to research, the center is a stem cell provider of human adult stem cells, rat stem cells, and mouse stem cells for researchers internationally, with a signed Tulane University Materials Transfer Agreement and handling fee. The center isolates, expands, and characterizes the stem cells in the laboratory and provides protocols for expansion as well as information on the cells.

The Louisiana State University is a public institution of higher learning, with majors in the physical sciences and with schools of medicine in New Orleans and Shreveport. The main campus of the university system is located in Baton Rouge, with campuses throughout the state. Research on stem cells includes survival of stem cells after freezing and their capability to proliferate and differentiate, developing technology in engineering stem cells in sheets or three-dimensional structures for transplant, and working with the Pennington Center to develop protocols for the cryopreser-vation of human adipose adult stem cells. Clinical research through the Gene Therapy Program at the Health Sciences Center at the School of Medicine in New Orleans includes translating the basic science of genetic involvement in disease into clinical therapy to prevent or treat some cancers or to restore function to diseased tissues or organs.

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Louisiana (Stem Cell) – what-when-how

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